Shooting Times & Country 22-Sep-2021

Since its launch in 1882, Shooting Times & Country Magazine has been at the forefront of the shooting scene. The magazine is the clear first choice for shooting sportsmen, with editorial covering all disciplines, including gameshooting, rough shooting, pigeon shooting, wildfowling and deer stalking. Additionally the magazine has a strong focus on the training and use of gundogs in the field and, because it is a weekly publication, the magazine keeps readers firmly up-to-date with the latest news in their world.

País:
United Kingdom
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Future Publishing Ltd
Periodicidad:
Weekly
USD 3.44
USD 107.32
52 Números

en este número

1 min.
works of art

Some weeks ago, I went to visit a taxidermist in East Anglia. I asked him, while looking at his work, if he considers it to be art. Initially he laughed and told me it didn’t bother him what people call it, so long as he can find a buyer for the work, but later he said that he supposes it is art really, given the skill it takes, as well as how beautiful the end result is. A few days later, back in Scotland, I walked into the village one morning to go to see Martin the stick maker. As he said, my mother has one of his sticks, my father has one, he taught my brother to make them and it was about time I got one too. In the…

shotimcouuk210922_article_004_01_01
2 min.
hawk flown from moving vehicle in ‘appalling’ video

Shooting Times has passed information to police forces in England and Wales after an investigation into the underground sport of ‘urban falconry’ where birds of prey are flown from moving vehicles. We were made aware of the practice after a link to a video on social media was sent in by a reader who believed it may show criminality. The clip showed a Harris hawk being flown from the window of a moving vehicle and being used to catch crows and pigeons on suburban roadsides. After viewing the clip and consulting with experts in wildlife law, our reporters established it did show potential offences under the Wildlife and Countryside Act — as well as being extremely poor practice. By comparing street scenes shown in the video with images from Google Street View, Shooting…

shotimcouuk210922_article_006_01_01
1 min.
carnage there and nothing more

A gamekeeper has told Shooting Times about his fears for ground-nesting birds if raven numbers are allowed to grow unchecked. The keeper, who did not wish to be named, explained: “Raven numbers are through the roof here. The biggest problems come with large numbers of juvenile birds, which work systematically across open country, cleaning up chicks and eggs.” Ravens are legally protected across the UK, despite British Trust for Ornithology data showing that their population has increased by 21% in the past 10 years. Individual licences can be applied for to control ravens; however, farmers and keepers claim they are rarely allowed to cull an adequate number of birds to make a difference. Keepers from the Tayside and Central Scotland Moorland Group have begun filming groups of the birds to demonstrate the scale…

shotimcouuk210922_article_007_01_01
1 min.
antique firearms law change

The deadline has arrived for an important change to the law on antique firearms. Owners of firearms in .320 British (also known as .320 Revolver CF, short or long), .41 Colt (short or long), .44 Smith & Wesson Russian, .442 Revolver (also known as .44 Webley), 9.4mm Dutch Revolver, 10.6mm German Ordnance Revolver or 11mm French Ordnance Revolver M1873 (Army) must now hold these on a firearm certificate or potentially face prison. These were previously considered to be ‘obsolete calibres’ and could be held without a certificate by collectors. However, in March, the Government changed the law in response to the use of these calibres in a series of crimes. Christian Ashwell, criminal firearms threat lead at the National Crime Agency (NCA), said: “Criminals gaining access to these seven calibres of self-contained cartridge…

shotimcouuk210922_article_007_02_01
1 min.
to do this week

CHECK Service heaters and sweep chimneys in your beaters’/shoot hut. With cold weather on its way, it will soon be time to fire up the heating to warm tired bodies and to dry wet clothes. If you are using gas heaters, they should be serviced by a qualified technician before the season starts. That way, they will be safe and ready when they are needed. If you prefer a real fire, ensure chimneys and flues are properly swept. FIRST-AID Restock your canine first-aid kit. Early-season work can be hard on dogs. Tall cover can inflict cuts and scratches, with faces and paws particularly vulnerable. A well-stocked dog first-aid kit is a must for any shoot. As a minimum it should contain bandages, surgical tape, gauze, non-adhesive dressings and a thick towel.…

shotimcouuk210922_article_007_04_01
2 min.
snp’s future plans: hit country sports (again)

Shooting faces ‘an enormous task’ to secure its future in the country after Scotland’s government published its new programme. This included a Fox Control Bill, which the programme said would relate “to the use of dogs to hunt and flush foxes and other wild mammals” and would “introduce further measures such as preventing trail hunting”. Preventing any use of dogs to manage foxes has been a long-standing personal cause of some Green MSPs. The small percentage of land managed for grouse shooting was a major focus, with the programme claiming: “It is clear that urgent action is needed to tackle wildlife crime and to address the environmental impacts of intensive grouse moor management.” It added: “We will support the transition to more economically and environmentally productive uses of land.” The way deer are…

shotimcouuk210922_article_008_01_01