The Hollywood Reporter August 25, 2021

The all-new Hollywood Reporter offers unprecedented access to the people, studios, networks and agencies that create the magic in Hollywood. Published weekly, the oversized format includes exceptional photography and rich features.

País:
United States
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Penske Media Corporation
Periodicidad:
Weekly
USD 6.99
USD 99
48 Números

en este número

1 min.
heat index

Matt Blank With AMC Networks CEO Josh Sapan stepping down after a 26-year run, the former Showtime topper joins as interim CEO as the company looks for Sapan’s successor. Hugh Jackman The star of Warner Bros.’ sci-fi thriller Reminiscence, which debuted day-and-date on HBO Max, couldn’t lift its domestic opening-weekend box office past $1.95 million. Billie Eilish The singer’s Happier Than Ever tops the Billboard 200 for a third week, with 49.6 million on-demand streams of the album’s 16 songs, according to MRC Data. Angela Kang The Walking Dead showrunner sees the AMC drama fall to its smallest-ever linear premiere on Aug. 22 with 2.2 million viewers, down from 4 million for season 10. Showbiz Stocks $656.86 (+3.1%) ADOBE (ADBE) The software company struck a deal to buy Frame.io for $1.28 billion, boosting its cloud-based video production and post chops. $27.52…

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3 min.
hollywood’s recall resistance: newsom taps moguls to help

With ballots already mailed to voters in California deciding whether to oust Gov. Gavin Newsom in a Sept. 14 recall election, the embattled governor is pulling out all the stops, leaning on supporters in the entertainment industry to help raise money and rally followers to reject the recall effort. Since he was elected governor in 2018, Newsom — a San Francisco native — has made concerted efforts to spend more time in Southern California and make inroads with the powerful political constituencies in and around Los Angeles that obviously include the entertainment industry (it’s no coincidence that he held his 2018 election night party in downtown L.A. and delivered his annual State of the State address at Dodger Stadium in March). Now, he’s hoping that the local networking will pay off. One…

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1 min.
gavin newsom returns to hollywood atm

Source: California Secretary of State’s office HASTINGS: BENOIT TESSIER/POOL/AFP VIA GETTY IMAGES. CHAN: RICH FURY/GETTY IMAGES. KATZENBERG: JON KOPALOFF/GETTY IMAGES. JOBS: NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP VIA GETTY IMAGES. MAYER: TAYLOR HILL/GETTY IMAGES. SCHMIDT: DONATO SARDELLA/GETTY IMAGES FOR LACMA. GEHRY: GEORGE PIMENTEL/GETTY IMAGES. SABAN: MICHAEL TRAN/GETTY IMAGES. SPIELBERG: BRUCE GLIKAS/WIREIMAGE. WALDEN: ALBERTO E. RODRIGUEZ/GETTY IMAGES. DOLBY: VINCENT SANDOVAL/WIREIMAGE. ALLEN: JC OLIVERA/GETTY IMAGES. STREISAND: JASON MERRITT/GETTY IMAGES FOR NETFLIX.…

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2 min.
how youtube is fighting tiktok: ‘insane’ sub growth for creators

It started as an experiment for one creator management group: What would happen if three of their shortform creators, popular on apps like TikTok but relatively unknown on YouTube, went all in on posting to YouTube’s new shortform platform, Shorts? The answer: surprisingly rapid subscriber growth and views in the millions. Alyssa McKay, who has 8.5 million followers on TikTok, was one of the first creators to try out Shorts in February while it was still in beta mode. Beginning with 40,000 subscribers, which she acquired back when she posted a smattering of videos, McKay started posting her “rich girl” videos — a POV-style series first popular on TikTok — to YouTube. Six months later, McKay boasts more than a half a million subscribers on YouTube, and her most popular Shorts…

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3 min.
how to (successfully) market a movie that keeps getting delayed

During the past year and a half, multiple studios stared down a now-familiar scenario: delaying the release of a tentpole movie and pulling the plug on a marketing campaign, only to try to figure out how to reposition the title many months later. Marketing execs face an uphill climb — not to mention a budget crunch — when this happens, and many projects haven’t quite achieved liftoff at the box office when they finally unspool. But Disney’s Free Guy, which has grossed more than $111 million globally since its Aug. 13 stateside launch, offers a surprising case study in how to sell a film that’s been delayed multiple times because of the pandemic. Star Ryan Reynolds worked closely with Disney marketing chief Asad Ayaz, who led the varied campaign for the…

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4 min.
wall street’s red hot real estate play: film and tv soundstages

Not too long ago, before the pandemic, some real estate investors may have shunned studio lots over fears they would be left with idle or underused shooting stages. Now, as Wall Street cools on office towers, hotels and shopping malls amid remote work, online shopping and COVID-19, major private equity money is flowing to operators of studio lots in North American cities. “We’re the new asset class for large financial institutions,” says Chris Cooney, CEO of EUE/Screen Gems Studios, which runs an 11-stage Atlanta complex where Netflix’s Stranger Things season four shot in 2020. To meet a growing subscriber demand for streaming film and TV content, top studio markets in Los Angeles, Toronto, Vancouver, Atlanta and New York now see developers investing to own campus-size facilities. (And longtime owners are cashing…

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