Time Magazine International Edition April 12, 2021

Time Magazine International Edition is the go-to news magazine for what is happening around the globe. You can rely on TIME's award winning journalists for analysis and insight into the latest developments in politics, business, health, science, society and entertainment.

País:
United Kingdom
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Time Magazine UK Ltd.
Periodicidad:
Weekly
USD 6.81
USD 75.67
25 Números

en este número

3 min.
conversation

STRENGTH IN ADVERSITY YOUR COVERAGE ON “Women and the Pandemic” [March 15–22] exemplified the remarkable spirit of women from different strata of society during the worst nightmare we are all facing. It’s their undying resilience that has powered them to navigate this humanitarian crisis and reaffirms how formidable they are in terms of grit and gumption. Pritish De,WAUKESHA, WIS. FESTERING RAGE RE “ON THE HUNT FOR Hate” [March 15–22]: Far-right extremism is not uniquely American, but the U.S. is rapidly becoming its epicenter. As witnessed with the Capitol siege, the movement is characterized only by its hate, mindless violence and nihilistic anarchism. “Fake news,” unhinged conspiracies and government-sponsored disinformation over the past four years have emboldened the far right and make President Biden’s task of controlling this American disease formidable. Bob Barnes,WEDDERBURN, AUSTRALIA MAJOR HISTORY RE “LEVELING…

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2 min.
for the record

‘If folks don’t want to visit a doughnut shop, they don’t have to.’MIKE TATTERSFIELD, Krispy Kreme CEO, in a March 27 interview responding to criticism of the fast-food chain’s announcement that it would give one free doughnut per day to anyone showing proof of COVID-19 vaccination‘No one can take a drop from Egypt’s water, and if it happens there will be inconceivable instability in the region.’ABDUL FATTAH AL-SISI, President of Egypt, raising concerns on March 30 that a massive dam being built by Ethiopia on the Blue Nile could impact Egypt’s water supply‘WE ARE JUST ALMOST THERE, BUT NOT QUITE YET.’ROCHELLE WALENSKY, CDC director, saying she has a sense of “impending doom” over a possible fourth COVID-19 wave in the U.S. and urging Americans to continue following public-health guidelines, at…

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5 min.
after huge 2020 turnout, gop moves to restrict voting

MOMENTS AFTER GOVERNOR BRIAN KEMP signed a sweeping overhaul of Georgia’s election law, state representative Park Cannon, a Democrat, knocked on the door of his office. Kemp was making an announcement inside, and law-enforcement officials told Cannon to stop. She continued, and was swiftly dragged down a corridor of the state capitol by two Georgia State Patrol officers. “All we asked is for her to be able to see [Kemp] sign a bill that is signing our rights away,” state representative Erica Thomas, a Democrat who watched Cannon’s arrest, said in a video posted on Instagram. “And you arrested her.” What Kemp was signing on March 25 was among the first in a spate of new restrictions on voting, igniting a political battle over the future of voting rights in the…

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2 min.
trans rights in the spotlight as u.s. states pass discriminatory bills

AS MARCH 31 MARKED THE ANNUAL Transgender Day of Visibility, LGBTQ advocates in the U.S. warned that a flurry of legislation targeting access to gender-affirming health care and sports participation for young transgender people will have significant and harmful effects. Over 100 bills attacking transgender people have been introduced in state legislatures since 2020, according to the ACLU, with over 60 currently in consideration across the country. HEALTH CARE BANS On March 29, the Arkansas senate passed a bill that would ban access to gender-affirming health care for transgender youth. If signed into law by Republican Governor Asa Hutchinson, the state would be the first to ban such access. Chase Strangio, deputy director for transgender justice at the ACLU’s LGBT & HIV Project, called it “the single most extreme anti-trans law…

1 min.
news ticker

Mexico police under fire over custody death Protests in Mexico and El Salvador have followed the March 27 death of Victoria Salazar in Tulum. Authorities have confirmed Salazar, a Salvadoran woman, died of a broken neck while in police custody. The Quintana Roo state prosecutor said his office is preparing femicide charges against four officers involved in her arrest. GOP Rep. in sex-crime investigation The Department of Justice is investigating whether Republican Florida Representative Matt Gaetz violated federal sex-trafficking laws over an alleged sexual relationship with a 17-year-old girl, the New York Times reported March 30. Gaetz has strongly denied the charges. Jailed Kremlin critic declares hunger strike Imprisoned Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny said in a March 31 Instagram post published by his lawyers that he will be on a hunger strike until the…

2 min.
will amazon workers ignite a labor-union revolution?

IN THE SLEEPY SOUTHERN TOWN OF BESSEMER, ALA., A brigade of Amazon warehouse workers has challenged one of the largest retail organizations in the world to a unionization battle. If a simple majority of the roughly 6,000 workers have voted for the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU) to represent them by the March 29 deadline, they will be the first group of Amazon employees to form a union in the U.S., after several failed attempts at other plants. While the RWDSU faced an uphill battle—before voting started, Amazon organized mandatory antiunion meetings at the warehouse—a vote for unionization could spur more workers at the company and beyond to seek bargaining power, marking an increase in private-sector union membership that has been in decline for decades. If the vote fails,…