Travel + Leisure

Travel + Leisure April 2021

Añadir a favoritos

TRAVEL + LEISURE™ is an indispensable guide to where to stay, what to eat, and what to do around the globe. Every month, TRAVEL + LEISURE™ puts easy trip ideas, itineraries, and insider information right at your fingertips. Get advice from our travel experts and view the magazine's award-winning photography. The digital edition of TRAVEL + LEISURE™ has all the tools you need to take you where you want to go.

Leer Más
País:
United States
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Meredith Corporation
Periodicidad:
Monthly
SUSCRIBIRSE
USD 19.99
12 Números

en este número

6 min.
letter from the editor

CONTRIBUTORS 1. Imani Bashir ROOM TO GROW (P. 38) The Cancún, Mexico–based writer checked in to Palmaïa—a new holistic resort in the Yucatán that promotes a plant-forward diet. Bashir loved the way the property is making a concerted effort to positively impact its environment. “I was impressed by the resort’s good intentions, not just for its guests but also for the surrounding plants and wildlife.” 2. Jonathan Becker PRIVACY PLEASE (P. 76) Although it had been a decade since Becker visited the private, family-owned Guana Island, part of the British Virgin Islands, “it was even more exceptional than I remembered,” notes the photographer, who lives in New York City. “The topographical scale, tropical beauty, and sensitive and subtle way the mostly stone buildings integrate into their natural surroundings are all enchanting.” 3. Hermione Hoby SONG OF ZION (P.…

4 min.
at one with nature

A GLOBETROTTER’S GUIDE TO THE LATEST IN TRAVEL ON MY FIRST NIGHT at One&Only Mandarina, 40 miles north of Puerto Vallarta, I sat at a restaurant that, I’d been told, was star chef Enrique Olvera’s interpretation of the palapa: the palm-thatch and plywood structures that dot Mexico’s nearly 6,000 miles of coastline where beachgoers can grab beers, fried fish, and punishingly spicy aguachile. The description seemed like a stretch—Carao is, in fact, a fine-dining restaurant at one of Mexico’s most anticipated luxury resorts. But my doubts were assuaged when the first course arrived from the open kitchen run by Jesús Durón, who has worked with Olvera since 2014. A sheaf of seaweed “chicharrón,” served with sea urchin and pico de gallo, tasted like a drift of salty sea air. I was drinking…

2 min.
home grown

Big, bumpy, and electric green, ‘ulu, or breadfruit, looks like a cross between a lime and a basketball. Early Polynesian voyagers brought the plant to Hawaii along with other long-lasting “canoe foods” like taro and sweet potato. They depended on it during hurricanes and droughts for its high nutritional value and ability to withstand dry conditions and resist disease. When ripe, the protein-rich fruit is sweet and has a soft, pudding-like texture. When roasted in its unripe state, it puffs up like baked bread and tastes like potato. Despite its “superfood” status, ‘ulu has fallen out of favor, according to Dana Shapiro, the manager of the Hawai‘i ‘Ulu Cooperative, a Big Island–based organization made up of around 100 farmers. “There are a lot of traditional crops that aren’t eaten here anymore…

2 min.
two for teas

FOR SMASHING PUMPKINS front man Billy Corgan and his partner, fashion designer Chloé Mendel—founder of luxury faux-fur brand Maison Atia—the town of Highland Park, Illinois, ticks all the boxes: it has a vibrant downtown, a large population of artists, and plenty of family-run businesses. The only thing it was missing back in 2011, when the couple settled in the Chicago suburb, was a restaurant to suit their plant-based lifestyle. So a year later, Corgan and Mendel opened Madame ZuZu’s (madamezuzus.com), a teahouse and restaurant serving modestly priced vegan dishes like a “meatball” sub using a baguette from local bakery, Hewn, and hot brews from Rare Tea Cellar, a Chicago emporium that sells ingredients from all over the world, including Japanese yuzu peel and cocoa nibs from Ecuador. The café also…

2 min.
viticulture goes virtual

“OUR AMBITION IS to re-create the magic of visiting a wine region without the carbon footprint of stepping on an airplane,” says Michael Baum, the owner of the renowned Burgundy estate Château de Pommard and the founder of the new subscription-based service Vivant (vivant.eco; annual membership $149). Billed as the world’s first “livestreaming wine experience platform,” the company is aiming to raise awareness of organic and biodynamic wines in France (with Italy, Spain, and Germany to come) while modernizing the tasting experience for the digital age. The weekly live sessions—which range from 30 minutes to an hour—are available at levels from beginner to advanced, and each is hosted by a certified wine educator. One week, you might learn all about Muscadet, an unassuming white wine from the Loire Valley; the…

2 min.
blazing new trails

IN THE 13TH CENTURY, Polynesian navigators set foot on New Zealand’s North Island, an untouched world of primordial forests, gushing rivers, and exotic animals. They named the realm Aotearoa, or “land of the long white cloud,” and quickly adapted their seafaring culture to the cool, misty environment. Today, many of the Maori’s ancient traditions continue to thrive and evolve on both of New Zealand’s main islands. And as traveler demand for meaningful experiences grows, so does the range of Indigenous-tourism offerings, many of which have been dreamed up by a young generation of community leaders. Founded by members of the Kāti Huirapa ki Puketeraki, of the eastern coast of the South Island, Karitane Maori Tours (karitanemaoritours.com) is an adventure and ecotourism company that operates waka (canoe) journeys down the Waikouaiti River, as…