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Science
National Geographic Magazine

National Geographic Magazine June 2020

The latest news in science, exploration, and culture will open your eyes to the world’s many wonders. Get a National Geographic digital magazine subscription today and experience the same high-quality articles and breathtaking photography contained in the print edit.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
National Geographic Society
Frequency:
Monthly
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12 Issues

in this issue

1 min.
take in the wonders of national parks of europe

About four decades after the United States created its first national park (Yellowstone), Sweden set aside nine wilderness areas, “and the rest of Europe then followed.” So says this glorious guide to 460 parks, including the one above in Aberdeenshire, Scotland. Organized by region, Complete National Parks of Europe spotlights historic sites, cultural treasures, scenic hikes, flora, fauna, and more. The richly illustrated volume is available wherever books are sold. BOOKS Almanac 2021 from Nat Geo Kids The latest edition of this best-selling kids’ almanac brims with fun facts; games; features about animals, science, technology, conservation—even homework help. Kids Almanac 2021 is available wherever books are sold. TELEVISION Savor adventure alongside this renowned chef The second season of Gordon Ramsay: Uncharted follows the chef as he journeys off the beaten path. A new season returns Sunday,…

4 min.
sharing the stories of those who came home

THE PARTICIPANTS WHO SURVIVED THAT CONFLICT ARE NOW MOSTLY IN THEIR 90S, AND IT’S IMPORTANT TO HEAR FROM THEM. IN 2005, my husband, Geoffrey Etnire, and I went with his parents to visit Normandy, France. We knew that Geoff’s father, Bob, had been involved in some way in D-Day, but like many men of his generation, he never spoke of it. When asked for details about what happened, Bob would only say that he went over “later.” No one pushed the point, and the family came to assume that “later” meant days or even weeks after the first D-Day landings on June 6, 1944. Standing on Omaha Beach, we found out how wrong we were. I knew I wasn’t supposed to press Bob about his experiences in World War II. But on that windswept…

2 min.
thank you

All of us at the National Geographic Society wish to express our gratitude to the philanthropic partners listed below who supported our work with a gift of $25,000 or more in 2019. Through your generosity, you’re helping to illuminate and protect the wonder of our world. ADOBE INC. | AIR NEW ZEALAND LIMITED | RITA ALLEN FOUNDATION | AMERICAN EXPRESS PAUL M. ANGELL FAMILY FOUNDATION | BEAGLE CHARITABLE FOUNDATION | BRENDAN AND HELEN BECHTEL | LINDA K. BERDINE MR. THOR BJORGOLFSSON AND MS. KRISTÍN ÓLAFSDÓTTIR | ROBERT K. BLACK AND J. ORMOND SANDERSON, JR. GEORGE R. BOLINT | THE BPB AND HPB FOUNDATION | KATHERINE AND DAVID BRADLEY | DIANE AND HAL BRIERLEY EDITH S. BRISKIN AND THE SHIRLEY K. SCHLAFER FOUNDATION | BRITA | BURT’S BEES C PROGRAM, A VENTURE…

1 min.
from inside the quarantine

LOOKING AT THE EARTH FROM EVERY POSSIBLE ANGLE…

1 min.
the backstory

GABRIELE GALIMBERTI placed two stands of photographic lights in front of a window outside a dwelling. He retreated so the people inside could safely retrieve the lights. Shouting through the window, Galimberti directed the positioning of lights and people, then made his photos. This is quarantine portraiture. “It’s the strangest moment I’ve lived in 42 years of life,” says Galimberti, an Italian photographer who was in Milan in late February when the lockdown went into effect. He and journalist Gea Scancarello spent the following weeks documenting how coronavirus changed life in the city. In hopes of making portraits of some of Milan’s inhabitants, they began calling their friends. “I immediately felt a sort of fear in their voices,” Galimberti recalls. “Fear about the idea of going out and, a couple of times,…

6 min.
how satire helps science

ILLUMINATING THE MYSTERIES—AND WONDERS—ALL AROUND US EVERY DAY IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN Stephen Colbert, John Oliver, Jimmy Kimmel, or any of the other sharp-tongued talk show hosts of late-night TV. In this instance, it was Samantha Bee, on her program Full Frontal, doing a stand-up routine about opposition to childhood vaccinations. “The anti-vax movement has been spreading faster than Legionnaires’ disease at the Playboy Mansion,” Bee declared, barely pausing for audience laughter. Claims that these vaccines are harmful rest on shoddy science, she said; the vaccines have been deemed safe by the World Health Organization and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Who are you going to believe?” she asked. “Leading authorities on medical science, or 800 memes on your cousin’s Facebook page?” Joking about science can have serious effects, according to…