EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Kids & Teens
National Geographic Kids

National Geographic Kids

August 2020

National Geographic Kids magazine - the perfect balance between learning and fun! A must-have for children ages 6 and up. Each issue is packed with colorful photos, games, puzzles, fun features and facts about animals, science, technology, and more.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
National Geographic Society
Frequency:
Monthly
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10 Issues

in this issue

1 min.
weird but true!

JANE BURTON / NATURE PICTURE LIBRARY (CAT); JOHN DANIELS / ARDEA LONDON LTD (HAMSTER), STUDIO DMM PHOTOGRAPHY, DESIGNS & ART / SHUTTERSTOCK (PICTURE FRAME), IMAGE DIGITALLY COMPOSED; R.SHEDLOVSKY / SHUTTERSTOCK (CHARCOAL); SIMPLE STOCK SHOTS (DOLL); RUBBERBALL / JUPITERIMAGES (CAKE); JOE ATLAS / BRAND X PICTURES / JUPITERIMAGES (BIKE)…

1 min.
guinness world records

HUGE RACKET You’ll need a really big Ping-Pong ball to play with the world’s largest table-tennis racket. The oversize paddle measures nearly 12 feet tall, or roughly the height of an adult male African elephant. That’s about 20 times bigger than a standard paddle. International Table Tennis Federation rules state that rackets can be any size, so you could use it in competition. But you’d have to be able to lift it first! PIG PERFORMS TRICKS Joy isn’t just a one-trick miniature pig. The swine completed 13 tricks in less than 60 seconds, earning the title of most tricks performed by a pig in one minute. Joy’s showstoppers include playing a toy piano, lifting a ring off its stand, and unrolling a rug. Now that’s some pig. SCOOPS ON SCOOPS Italy is home to the…

1 min.
naughty pets

NAME Cuddles FAVORITE ACTIVITY Helping maintain a bug-free home FAVORITE TOY Flyswatter PET PEEVE Spiderwebs on the ceiling NAME Baxter FAVORITE ACTIVITY Checking Buddy’s homework FAVORITE TOY Paper shredders PET PEEVE Violin practice NAME Herbie FAVORITE ACTIVITY Spreading couch stuffing around the house to cover the ugly carpet FAVORITE TOY Sofa pillows PET PEEVE Plastic chairs NAME Marshmallow FAVORITE ACTIVITY Extreme tree climbing FAVORITE TOY Empty squirrel nests PET PEEVE When the crows steal the catnip G.K. HART / VIKKI HART / GETTY IMAGES (CUDDLES, HERBIE); COLORBLIND / GETTY IMAGES (BAXTER); © FLIP DE NOOYER / FOTO NATURA / MINDEN PICTURES (MARSHMALLOW)…

3 min.
amazing animals

Flamingo Says “Save the Earth!” Willemstad, Curaçao Bob the flamingo likes taking dips in his own saltwater pool and getting foot massages on the beach. This hardworking bird deserves all the pampering: He’s teaching kids about conservation. Veterinarian and wildlife sanctuary founder Odette Doest rescued Bob after he flew into a hotel window. After rehabilitating him, she realized he wouldn’t be able to survive in the wild. So Doest decided to keep Bob at her sanctuary and use the friendly bird to help educate people. She often brings Bob to schools to teach kids about plastic pollution, which can harm wildlife when the animals become entangled in fishing gear or mistake discarded balloons as food. Bob helps people understand how a small change in their habits can have a big impact on his…

6 min.
sit! stay! swim!

Hundreds of Australian sea lions have gathered together along the Australian coast. Some are sprawled out on the beach, sunning themselves. Others bark as they chase each other in the surf. Minus their flippers, these animals could fit right in at a dog park. These marine mammals actually do remind some people of our furry pooch pals. “Sea lions are curious and playful, which is very doglike,” says Deena Weisberg, a researcher who studies human and sea lion interactions in the Galápagos Islands in the Pacific Ocean. “Even when they’re in the water, they behave very similarly to dogs.” So should sea lions really be called sea dogs instead? Check out these five behaviors to decide. 1 They bark—loudly. Two male Galápagos sea lions stare at each other and begin to bark, taking…

2 min.
sea lion squad

California sea lion Found along the western coast of North America, these sea lions often gather in groups on docks to rest and can zip underwater at speeds of up to 25 miles an hour. New Zealand sea lion Also known as Hooker’s sea lion, this species lives along the coasts of southern New Zealand. Only about 3,000 are left, making them the rarest sea lions in the world. Australian sea lion You’ll find these sea lions along the southern and western coasts of Australia. Great climbers, they’re often spotted on cliffs, sometimes climbing as high as a hundred feet. Steller sea lion These sea lions live near coasts in the North Pacific Ocean. They’re the largest sea lion, with adult males weighing up to 2,500 pounds, more than twice the weight of a…