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Kids & Teens
National Geographic Kids

National Geographic Kids

February 2021

National Geographic Kids magazine - the perfect balance between learning and fun! A must-have for children ages 6 and up. Each issue is packed with colorful photos, games, puzzles, fun features and facts about animals, science, technology, and more.

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Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
National Geographic Society
Frequency:
Monthly
SUBSCRIBE
$19.99
10 Issues

in this issue

1 min.
weird but true!

TREES WITH SQUARE TRUNKS GROW IN PANAMA.A SMALL LUMP OF GOLD CAN BE FLATTENED INTO A SHEET AS BIG AS A TENNIS COURT. © ISSELEE / DREAMSTIME (KOALAS); SUE DALY / NPL / MINDEN PICTURES (LOBSTER); JACK KURTZ UPI PHOTO SERVICE / NEWSCOM (MULE); ZONECREATIVE / ISTOCKPHOTO (WATERMELON); © KIRSTY PARGETER / DREAMSTIME (PEOPLE)…

1 min.
incredible animal friends

OWL SNUGGLES WITH DUCK North Yorkshire, England Someone forgot to tell Larch the long-eared owl that owls sometimes hunt ducklings. His first best friend? A white-crested runner duck. The two young birds spent hours together preening (also called grooming) each other’s feathers at the Kirkleatham Owl Centre where they both hatched. Paired up because neither had siblings, the birds immediately bonded. The two often napped together, remembers center manager Craig Wesson. Dark, fuzzy Larch would fall asleep on top of his fluffy duck friend, and when the duck woke up, she sometimes stood up so fast that the little owl tumbled off. This never bothered Larch, but the duckling’s fondness for water was a bigger problem. Owl feathers aren’t waterproof like duck feathers, so it’s hard for owls to get dry when…

1 min.
guinness world records

GET OUT OF HER WAY! Emma is a pretty speedy dog—even on two legs. The pup can run about 33 feet on her hind legs in 3.05 seconds, as well as jump five hurdles on her hind legs in 5.66 seconds. That’s the fastest time for those stunts by a dog. Emma’s tricks took years of training, but she had plenty of motivation during practice: a doggie treat at the finish line. SMOOSHED CAR You’ve probably never seen an electric car like this one. Measuring about a foot and a half from the ground to its highest part, the lowest roadworthy car runs on batteries instead of gasoline. Built by high school students and their teachers, the car is called the Mirai, which means “future” in Japanese. That’s a future we want now. FLAMING…

1 min.
bet you didn’t know!

1 Conversation candy hearts, popular on Valentine’s Day, were originally invented as a cure for sore throats. 2 Yellow roses symbolize happiness, warmth, and friendship. 3 A study found that you and your friends may have similar brainwaves—meaning that your brains respond to information in the same ways. 4 Scientists are developing “sociable robots”—robots designed to act as our friends and companions. 5 Cats often show their affection by wrapping their tails around loved ones. 6 Scientists think that dogs dream about their owners. 7 Scientists have found that cows have best friends, just like humans.…

2 min.
awesome 8

1 YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT Near the rocky shores of California and Mexico’s Baja California, a neon Spanish shawl nudibranch is hard to miss crawling on corals or fluttering through open water. This flashy finger-length slug gets its bright color by recycling pigments from its favorite food, tiny plantlike jellyfish known as hydroids. GNARLY NUDIBRANCHS THEY MIGHT BE NICKNAMED “SEA SLUGS,” BUT THESE CREATURES ARE ANYTHING BUT LAZY. 2 PATTERN PLAY Fluorescent stripes and polka dots turn Nembrotha kubaryana’s costume into a can’t-miss warning sign for potential predators. Distinguished by its often orange edging, this nudibranch lives in tropical western Pacific and Indian Ocean waters and can grow up to 4.7 inches long. 3 DEADLY SURFER The thumbnail-size blue dragon cruises tropical oceans, using a stomach bubble to float on the surface while it searches…

3 min.
amazing animals

South Luangwa National Park, Zambia Pucker up! On a safari drive, guide Patrick Njobvu watched as a young hippopotamus emerged from the Luangwa River, walked over to a snoozing spotted hyena, and started to sniff. “The hyena didn’t run, and both started sniffing each other, nose to nose, almost like kissing,” Njobvu says. The two animals hung out together for about 20 minutes before walking away. Experts don’t know why the hyena didn’t run off—some think it might have been too scared to move, while others believe that it could’ve been feeling very relaxed. And the hippo? It was likely just being curious. Behavioral ecologist Rob Heathcote says that young animals like this hippo are often more curious as they explore the world and learn how to behave. The “kiss” wasn’t true…