EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Kids & Teens
National Geographic Kids

National Geographic Kids March 2020

National Geographic Kids magazine - the perfect balance between learning and fun! A must-have for children ages 6 and up. Each issue is packed with colorful photos, games, puzzles, fun features and facts about animals, science, technology, and more.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
National Geographic Society
Frequency:
Monthly
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10 Issues

in this issue

1 min.
weird but true!

About A BILLION BACTERIA could be in your mouth right now. MEN get the HICCUPS more often than WOMEN do. Crocodiles have been around for about 200 MILLION YEARS. SMOOTH PEANUT BUTTER is more popular on the East Coast of the United States; CHUNKY rules on the West Coast. One of the world’s MOST EXPENSIVE TREE HOUSES, located in Scotland, cost about $4 MILLION to build. Thomas Jefferson’s recipe for VANILLA ICE CREAM is in the Library of Congress. Scientists believe that SATURN’S RINGS will eventually disappear. Between 1912 and 1918, you could take your money to Washington, D.C., to be WASHED and IRONED. Some fish can change from FEMALE to MALE. CHECK OUT THE BOOK! BRAND X PICTURES/PUNCHSTOCK (PEANUT BUTTER); DIGITAL VISION/GETTY IMAGES (DOLLAR BILL), CULLEN MACIAS/SHUTTER-STOCK (IRON), IMAGE DIGITALLY COMPOSED; VIOLETKAIPA/SHUTTERSTOCK (GLASS); THE ALNWICK GARDEN TRUST (TREE HOUSE); PHOTODISC/SUPERSTOCK…

1 min.
guinness world records

ONE-FINGER PUSH-UPS Tackling 41 push-ups in 30 seconds is impressive. But doing 41 push-ups in 30 seconds on just one finger? That’s mind-boggling. Xie Guizhong of Beijing, China, set the record for the most one-finger push-ups in 30 seconds. Xie also holds the record for the fastest time to push a car 165 feet with one digit. He’s definitely got his fingers all over the record books. SUPER-HIGH SLIDE Tired of taking the stairs? Take the slide instead! That’s what visitors to the U.S. Bank Tower in Los Angeles, California, can do. At 918 feet aboveground, the Skyslide is the highest slide on the outside of a building, with its enclosed glass tube sending sliders from the 70th floor to the 69th. Call us when they add a teeter-totter to this sky-high playground. SO…

1 min.
bet you didn’t know!

SEROFF/SHUTTERTOCK (BACKGROUND), DANIEL HURST/SHUTTERSTOCK (FOUR-LEAF CLOVER), IMAGE DIGITALLY COMPOSED…

1 min.
all about money

MONEY TIP! SAVING FOR SOMETHING COOL? ON A CALENDAR, WRITE THE AMOUNT YOU’LL SAVE EACH WEEK SO YOU KNOW EXACTLY WHEN YOU CAN BUY THE ITEM. MARK THAT DATE WITH A GIANT STAR. MPI/STRINGER/GETTY IMAGES (THOMAS JEFFERSON), WINTERLING/DREAMSTIME (ART FRAME), IMAGE DIGITALLY COMPOSED. THE TRUSTEES OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM (RAFFIA, CHINESE COIN). MAMA_MIA/SHUTTERSTOCK (SILVERWARE), CCAT82/SHUTTERSTOCK (LINEN TABLECLOTH), IMAGE DIGITALLY COMPOSED…

2 min.
awesome 8

1 NIGHT LIGHTS Boca Ciega Bay in St. Petersburg, Florida, comes alive with lighted boats during a floating celebration of the winter holidays. Participants in the annual St. Pete Beach holiday boat parade also donate toys to kids in need. Sounds like a perfect parade! 2 FLOWER POWER For more than a century, fantastic flower-covered floats and marching bands have dazzled crowds at the annual Rose Parade on New Year’s Day. Not a fan of flowers? Stick around for a college football game that follows the parade. 3 BLAZING BOAT The Up Helly Aa festival in Lerwick, Scotland, ends every January in a blaze. Harking back to a Viking ritual, hundreds of torchbearers march through the town’s streets before setting a 30-footlong galley—a type of ship—on fire. 4 COLORFUL RITUAL Millions of people of the Hindu faith…

2 min.
amazing animals

Polka-Dotted Zebra! Masai Mara, Kenya This zebra is easy to spot: The foal’s dark coat is covered in white polka dots! “At first it looked like a different species altogether,” photographer Frank Liu says. The odd pattern is caused by a rare condition called pseudomelanism (pronounced soo-DOH-mel-uh-nih-zum). This means that the cells that create the red, yellow, brown, or black pigment in the mammal’s hair and skin aren’t working like they do in most animals. So instead of the colors running together to form stripes, they form dots. The condition doesn’t hurt the foal, now named Tira after the tour guide who first spotted her. But bugs might bite her more than the other zebras because scientists think that biting flies don’t like landing on striped surfaces. Plus her speckled pattern makes her stand…