ZINIO logo
EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
National Geographic Traveller Food

National Geographic Traveller Food

Spring 2021
Add to favorites

National Geographic Traveller Food focuses on where to go, what to see and how to explore the world via unique culinary experiences. Its writers talk to producers, suppliers, farmers, chefs and restaurateurs, and this authentic storytelling is accompanied by so-good-you-can-almost-taste-it photography. Whether it’s uncovering the truth behind a gourmet trend, sharing delicious recipes or taking readers on the bumpy journey from farm to fork, the magazine champions sustainability and celebrates local cultures. Across its pages, National Geographic Traveller Food serves up the latest culinary experiences, shares insight on cultural contexts and offers practical advice, from deconstructing classic dishes and ‘breaking bread’ with families across the globe to meeting the food world’s new pioneers.

Read More
Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
National Geographic Traveller (UK)
Frequency:
Quarterly
SUBSCRIBE
$12.69
4 Issues

in this issue

1 min.
contributors

Liliana López Sorzano While I’m a native of Colombia, I’ve long had a strong bond with Mexico — I visited regularly for 10 years before eventually moving here. I now live in Mexico City, where I enjoy street markets, great tortillas and various types of chillies. But it’s when I eat a breakfast of chilaquiles that I really feel at home. BREAKFAST, P46 Rebecca Seal When ceviche landed in Europe a few years ago, you’d have been forgiven for thinking it was a new invention. However, the history of this cured fish dish stretches back possibly thousands of years. While writing about it, my cravings went into overdrive, and getting hold of sushi-grade fish became a priority. CEVICHE, P90 Richard Orange The residents of the Svanholm commune were surprisingly sceptical of the hype around Danish…

1 min.
editor’s letter

Imagine learning that a friend or colleague routinely ate the same lunch or dinner, day after day, week after week? At best you’d think they were missing out; at worst, in need of some sort of intervention. But breakfast is different. Of the three main meals, it’s the only one for which repetition is indulged. Admit to consuming the same bowl of cereal, pastry or Pret muffin every morning and no one will judge you. After all, breakfast is simply fuel, right? And options are often limited, whether by time, appetite or the corridor of one’s commute. Routines, however, are often ripe for reconsideration. Surely, I’m not alone in wanting to do things differently once normality returns? Lockdown seems to have bred in many of us a desire to shake things up.…

1 min.
what’s online at nationalgeographic.co.uk/food-travel

Substantial meals Cosy up with our pick of the planet’s best-loved comfort foods, from Polish pierogi to Hungary’s beloved goulash and umami-rich Japanese ramen. What’s cooking? Online cooking classes, big sandwiches and a move away from fine dining: all these and more, in our roundup of the top food and drink trends for 2021. Quick fixes Whether it’s ‘midnight spaghetti’ or a seafood-spiked drink, there are plenty of ways to cure — or prevent — a hangover. We’ve rounded up the world’s most delicious remedies.…

2 min.
singapore street food

Every day, Singaporeans from all walks of life gather at the island’s 114 open-air hawker centres. For the equivalent of less than a fiver, they can sit down to piping hot bowls of coconut-laced laksa or char kway teow (fried flat rice noodles), smoky from the wok, and have change left over for a cup of freshly pressed sugarcane juice. Street food is a way of life here — so much so that the country’s ‘hawker culture’ was recently added to UNESCO’s List of Intangible Cultural Heritage. The past year has, of course, been tough for Singapore’s hawkers, but in normal times the markets are a cacophony of sounds, flavours and cultures all under one roof. Chinese hawkers, for instance, can be found touting the typically Malay dish of barbecued satay,…

2 min.
los angeles

1 BROAD STREET OYSTER CO TOPPED LOBSTER ROLL While they may be synonymous with Maine, there’s also a lobster roll revolution happening in Malibu, thanks to Broad Street Oyster Co. The modern seafood shack’s brioche buns are packed with claw and knuckle meat tossed in warm butter or seasoned mayo, with the option of caviar or Santa Barbara uni (sea urchin) on top. It’s all served with natural wine and enjoyed right by the ocean. broadstreetoyster.com 2 EL RUSO FLOURTORTILLA TACOS In a city big on tacos, Walter Soto and Julia Silva’s informal stand in Boyle Heights rises above the rest with hyper-fresh ingredients spooned into perfectly blistered, handmade tortillas. There are corn tortillas on offer, but Julia’s signature flour version — pliant and chewy — is the perfect base for the phenomenal grilled and…

2 min.
historic pubs

1 Ye Olde Trip To Jerusalem, Nottingham This pub is one of a handful that claim to be the oldest in England. Dating back to 1189, it’s said to have been a pit stop for crusading knights journeying to Jerusalem — hence the name. Adjoining Castle Rock in the shadow of Nottingham Castle, it’s a cross between a pub and a museum, with medieval caves built into the sandstone, several bars, and nooks filled with relics from the city’s history. greeneking-pubs.co.uk 2 Ye Olde Fighting Cocks, St Albans Also vying for the title of England’s oldest pub, this Hertfordshire institution is said to have been established in the eighth century. The building that survives today, however, was built in the 11th century and has an unusual octagonal shape (it was formerly a pigeon…