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BBC Gardeners' World

BBC Gardeners' World

May 2020

Gardeners' World Magazine is the authoritative voice in gardening, the clear market-leader since it launched in 1991. The award-winning editorial includes topical, practical advice in the readers' favourite 'what to do now' section, and regular contributions and features from the top names in BBC gardening. Packed with fresh ideas and clear advice - the innovative approach offers creative, practical and problem-solving solutions to all keen gardeners.

Land:
United Kingdom
Taal:
English
Uitgever:
Immediate Media Company London Limited
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12 Edities

in deze editie

1 min.
more from gardeners' world magazine

Discover… Stuck at home and wanting gardening guidance from familiar faces? Watch our extensive selection of video clips – from Alan on feeding, to growing dahlias – at gardenersworld.com/april-videos Explore… Got the taste for growing your own food? Take it further with our 132-page special edition, that comes with 6 packs of seed. Order for £9.99 including postage at bit.ly/GWGYO20 Get involved... The garden visiting season may be on hold now but be first to hear when it’s open again – and get the most from your new 2 for 1 Entry card – by signing up for our newsletter: see p30, where you’ll also find details of how to enter our new competition. Save more Subscribe today and receive a pair of Japanese Niwaki secateurs. You’ll get each issue delivered to your door and enjoy extra…

1 min.
welcome

At the height of a storm, you can never see far ahead – just what’s there in front of you, to reach and touch. As I write this, it feels like we’re in the eye of the storm – with the world changing by the hour, even minute. But step out into our gardens, and we get a different view. Change in the garden is more subtle – a slower ripple effect, that’s part of what makes gardening so calming. The act of planting something makes us look ahead, with hope and optimism. And while new shoots may look unassuming now, as a gardener I know they will power ahead and by the end of May be approaching the big picture I’d always imagined. This will happen across the land –…

3 min.
we love may

“Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May”Shakespeare STAR OF THE MONTH Primula ‘Inverewe’ When I was a child, we used to have a tin of boiled sweets in the car glove box: they were dusted with icing sugar › I am pretty sure that many of you will know exactly what I am talking about. These were dished out at moments of extreme boredom or imminent car sickness. I am mentioning them here because the Óâ›Ì«››e›ýÓòâ›››æþ››í››ÓÌ›››³í›°››››››Ì›æò›Â›››ªÓâ› ›››³í››þ›æ››a››íÅA›í°³æ››ÓÅÓòâ›››í°³æ›eÓþ›â››ý›Ì›°›æ› a dusting of white to remind us of the sugar. A bright, cheery orange that will light up a shady corner. Best on edge of a pond or stream under deciduous shrubs. Sterile, so divide in autumn. HxS 80cm x 40cm TICKLED PINK ››ª››òÅÓòæ›ßÅ›ÌíϚ›þ° â ›í° ›ĕÓþ âæ››òâæí› from a papery pod and dangle like the Queen…

2 min.
expert’s choice bearded iris

“Richard Of York Gave Battle In Vain” – remember that? Perhaps you’re too young, but your parents will remember it. It’s a mnemonic device, a neat way of remembering the colours of the rainbow. The initial letters of each word in the phrase are the initial letters of the rainbow colours, in the right order – red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, violet. So why are we harking back to our days in primary school? Because tall bearded irises are not only the most flamboyant perennials we can grow, but they’re also rare among plants in being available in every single rainbow colour, not to mention myriad colour combinations, including black! The other great thing about them is that although they’re dazzlingly colourful, they’re never crude or garish – they all…

4 min.
the full monty

Like any gardener, I am aware of how the garden is changing and unfolding at this time of year, from day-to-day, let alone across the months. In every other year of my life, the flower show season would be rising to its Chelsea climax along with most gardening activity, driven by the huge commercial trade that underpins it. But everything has changed. It is as though the world has been thrown up in the air and the pieces are cascading around us. All the bits are the same but they don’t fit together any more. It is not wartime, not the Blitz, not foot and mouth disease, not the great winter of ’63, not the floods – not like anything that we may have as a frame of reference. Coronavirus is…

3 min.
over the fence

Bedding plants are a cornerstone of the horticultural industry, and the foundation of our spring and summer gardens, because they are cheerful, familiar, colourful, easy and cheap. But wait a minute – easy and cheap? I don’t think so! After you buy them, they have to be watered regularly to get them established, and often you have to wait months before they fill their space, and then you have to constantly deadhead them to keep them going. And that’s before we even consider the amount of heat and other forms of energy needed to grow them before they are sold, and the often very unsustainable materials that are used in their production, such as composts and plastic packaging. “Increasingly, I like the idea of making bedding schemes using perennials” It’s time to…