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Byzantine Empire

Byzantine Empire

Byzantine Empire

Known for its beautiful buildings, glittering jewellery and fervent religiosity, the Byzantine Empire actually viewed itself as Roman. They believed the city of Constantinople (or Byzantium) was the new capital of the mighty Roman Empire, after its Western portion had fallen to barbarians. Constantinople’s glory is certainly fitting of a wealthy Roman city, but how much do we really know about this fascinating society, which lasted for 1000 years after its predecessor’s demise? All About History’s Book of the Byzantine Empire explores the origins of the empire, and how it grew to become a beacon of stability, even when it was surrounded by kingdoms in chaos. Learn why Constantinople developed into the wealthiest city in the world, and what its citizens did on their days off. Get inside the minds of Byzantium’s greatest thinkers, before exploring why Orthodox Christianity was the form of Christianity adopted throughout the Byzantine Empire. With beautiful mosaics, artefacts and artworks to admire, you’ll get a sense of the opulence of Byzantium by pouring through these pages. Perhaps most importantly, though, you can study the emperors and empresses that made the Byzantine world the longest-lasting Christian empire in history.

Land:
United Kingdom
Taal:
English
Uitgever:
Future Publishing Ltd
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EDITIE KOPEN
€ 8,26

IN DEZE EDITIE

1 min.
the byzantine empire

Known for its beautiful buildings, glittering jewellery and fervent religiosity, the Byzantine Empire actually viewed itself as Roman. They believed the city of Constantinople (or Byzantium) was the new capital of the mighty Roman Empire, after its Western portion had fallen to barbarians. Constantinople’s glory is certainly fitting of a wealthy Roman city, but how much do we really know about this fascinating society, which lasted for 1000 years after its predecessor’s demise? All About History’s Book of the Byzantine Empire explores the origins of the empire, and how it grew to become a beacon of stability, even when it was surrounded by kingdoms in chaos. Learn why Constantinople developed into the wealthiest city in the world, and what its citizens did on their days off. Get inside the minds of…

1 min.
byzantine empire

Future PLC Richmond House, 33 Richmond Hill, Bournemouth, Dorset, BH2 6EZ Bookazine Editorial Editor Alice Barnes-Brown Designer Laurie Newman Editorial Director Jon White Senior Art Editor Andy Downes Magazine Editorial Editor Jonathan Gordon Designer Kym Winters Editorial Director Timothy Williamson Senior Art Editor Greg Whitaker Contributors Hareth Al Bustani, Joanne Al-Samarae, Edoardo Albert, Mohammed Barber, Charlie Ginger, Philippa Grafton, Katharine Marsh, Nikole Robinson, Scott Reeves, Nikolaos Tzoumerkas, Nathan Websdale, Andrew Westbrook, Frances White, Jon Wright, Steven Mumby, Steve Dacombe, Briony Duguid, Newton Ribeiro, Ryan Wells All copyrights and trademarks are recognised and respected Advertising Media packs are available on request Commercial Director Clare Dove clare.dove@futurenet.com International Head of Print Licensing Rachel Shaw licensing@futurenet.com Circulation Head of Newstrade Tim Mathers Production Head of Production Mark Constance Production Project Manager Clare Scott Advertising Production Manager Joanne Crosby Digital Editions Controller Jason Hudson Production Managers Keely Miller, Nola Cokely, Vivienne Calvert, Fran Twentyman Management Chief Content Officer Aaron Asadi Commercial Finance Director…

2 min.
byzantine empire

BYZANTIUM IS BORN Greek colonists founded a city on the European side of the Bosporus Strait. Strategically placed between Europe and Asia Minor, Byzantium prospered, though the Greeks and Persians warred over it many times. 657 BCE NEW ROME Emperor Constantine the Great moved the capital of the Roman Empire to Byzantium to better manage its eastern frontiers. Endowed by his name, the new capital was rechristened Constantinople. 330 CE A PERMANENT SPLIT Upon the death of Emperor Theodosius I, his two sons, Arcadius and Honorius, inherited the Eastern and the Western halves of the Roman Empire respectively. The empire would never be reunited. 395 CE PAYING THE HUNS 424-43 CE THE WEST FALLS The overthrow of Romulus Augustus by the barbarian Odoacer marked the end of Western Roman Empire. However, Odoacer bent the knee to Constantinople and Eastern Rome endured for…

5 min.
royal dynasties

THEODOSIAN DYNASTY 379-457 The successful early years of the Byzantine Empire contrasted with the struggles faced by the rulers of Rome. A thriving economy allowed Constantinople to be fortified with huge walls, while extra cash was used to pay off potential invaders and employ mercenaries, including some of the Huns who sacked Rome LEONID DYNASTY 457-518 Leo I, the first of the Leonid dynasty, was put on the throne by Aspar, a powerful Gothic general serving in the Byzantine forces who expected him to be a puppet ruler. Instead a power struggle broke out that ended with Aspar’s assassination in 471. The Leonids ruled for another 47 years. JUSTINIAN DYNASTY 518–602 The Byzantine Empire entered its first golden age under the Justinians. The military campaigns of Justinian I – often known as Justinian the Great – attempted to…

14 min.
the empire strikes back justinian’s quest

The emperor Justinian never lacked admirers. Some of them lapsed into sycophancy. “You have a dignity beyond all others,” wrote Pope Agapetus, and “it was in the likeness of the heavenly kingdom that God gave you the earthly rule, that you might teach men the protection of justice and drive away the howling of those who rave against it”. Justinian would often be remembered as one of the towering figures of early Byzantine history: the law-maker, the reformer, the ruler who launched bold initiatives to win back territories in the west. On the other hand, some would portray him as the man who embarked upon pointless, costly military misadventures and left behind a toxic legacy. The emperor’s contemporaries couldn’t quite decide which analysis was correct, and historians continue to squabble…

1 min.
belisarius

Flavius Belisarius, born around the year 500, was the stuff of legend. His early adventures in the campaigns against the Persians were a hit-and-miss affair, but his reputation soared in the wake of the North African wars. Traditionally conquering heroes had returned to Rome and been rewarded with a 'triumph' – a lavish celebration of their deeds. Such festivities had not taken place for several centuries, but an exception was made for Belisarius. He strode into Constantinople and the crowds cheered at the procession. Initial successes in Italy enhanced Belisarius' reputation but, as the tide turned against the empire in the 540s, his position became less secure. Justinian seems to have worried about his general's ambitions and, rather churlishly, resented Belisarius' popularity. The general was called home and, after being pardoned…