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category_outlined / Auto's & Motoren
Car CraftCar Craft

Car Craft

February 2020

Get Car Craft digital magazine subscription today. It's all about pure American power from Chevy, Mopar, Ford, Buick, Olds, Pontiac, and even AMC. It's about the stuff that real car guys live for.

Land:
United States
Taal:
English
Uitgever:
TEN: The Enthusiast Network
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12 Edities

IN DEZE EDITIE

access_time3 min.
bangin’ gears

2020 DODGE CHARGER HELLCAT WIDEBODY When Pontiac coined the term “wide-track” to describe their potent performers in the early ’60s, it was innately understood by enthusiasts what that implied—more grip equal better performance. The actual improvement from this visual slight of hand was modest, but it was real, and it was popular. Seemingly overnight, manufacturers everywhere took to the low, wide look, cashing in at the dealership. The “wide-track” look became a de facto symbol of performance, even when it wasn’t convincingly in evidence. Dodge and SRT have changed all that with the Widebody Charger. I find this out firsthand as SRT development engineer, Jim Wilder, clips the apex of turn “1” at Sonoma Raceway with a ’20 Octane Red Charger SRT Hellcat, its tires barely registering any complaint. The official skidpad…

access_time1 min.
car craft

EDITORIAL Network Content Director Douglas R. Glad Editor Johnny Hunkins Senior Managing Editor Sarah Gonzales Hot Rod Network Executive Editor Phil McRae Production Editor Jordon Scott Director, Social Media Brandon Scarpelli Contributors JoAnn Bortles, Jefferson Bryant, Eric English, Mark Gearhart, Richard Holdener, Jeff Huneycutt, Jesse Kiser, Scotty Lachenauer, Steve Magnante, Jorge Nuñez, Jason Sands, George Trosley ART DIRECTION & DESIGN Art Director Roberta Conroy Creative Director Alan Muir ADVERTISING General Manager John Viscardo 813/777-4489 Eastern Sales Director Michael Essex 863/860-6023 Western Sales Director Scott Timberlake 310/531-5969 Advertising Operations Manager Monica Hernandez TEN: PUBLISHING MEDIA, LLC President Kevin Mullan SVP, Editorial & Advertising Operations Amy Diamond General Manager, Automotive Network Tim Foss Senior Director, Finance Catherine Temkin CONSUMER MARKETING, ENTHUSIAST MEDIA SUBSCRIPTION COMPANY, INC. SVP, Circulation Tom Slater VP, Retention & Operations Fulfillment Donald T. Robinson III VP, Acquisition & Database Marketing Victoria Linehan VP, Newsstand Retail Sales William Carter MOTORTREND GROUP President/General Manager Alex Wellen Group SVP, Sales Eric Schwab Head of Operations…

access_time4 min.
horsepower!

1,700HP LS-SWAPPED FEATHERWEIGHT 260Z Nathan Schaldach / Fresno, California A pretty good recipe for an insanely fast ride is cramming a huge engine into a small package. Especially popular in the ’70s-’90s were V-8 Chevy Vegas, Ford Pintos, Datsun Z cars, and other subcompacts. They were light, squirrelly, and of course, fast. Nate Schaldach from Fresno, California, decided to fast-forward this combination to 2019 and shove a 427ci LS-based engine into a featherweight 260Z. Nicknamed “Z-Unit,” the ’74 260Z has been as far away as Kansas for no-prep shootouts, and is a consistent runner in the My Maleree Mae foundation’s West Coast no-prep events that help raise money for children with cancer. What’s even more interesting is that the Z can be set up for any type of match race and has…

access_time4 min.
speed parts

EFI FUELING What it is: FiTech Force Fuel system Why you care: Everybody loves converting carbs to EFI, but nobody loves buying or installing the fuel system. Bummer. That is, until FiTech changed things with their Force Fuel system, which mounts underneath your existing mechanical pump and is fed by the same. The assembly holds ½-gallon of fuel to submerge the electric fuel pump, which keeps it cool for long life and prevents fuel starvation. An internal regulator keeps the pressure at a consistent 58 psi, which is ideal for reliable EFI performance. A serviceable 10-micron fuel filter is supplied to keep fine debris away from the injectors, along with 5 feet of high-pressure fuel hose, AN fittings, and clamps. The precision-machined extrusion is designed for strength and sealed tight. An easy-to-view…

access_time11 min.
distribution of power

One of the many things the LS motors have going for them is their intake manifold. Though they differ in their performance and internal design, the long-runner composite intakes offer a unique combination of weight reduction and performance. The use of composites provides not just weight reduction compared to either cast iron or aluminum, but also a smooth wall finish to enhance flow. The use of electronic (port) fuel injection and positioning of the injector at the end of the intake runner (near the cylinder head) means the runners are only required to flow air. The flow rate of the available port volume is maximized by not having the fuel displace some of the potential airflow. Like the free-flowing heads used on the LS engine family, the intake manifold is one…

access_time6 min.
coyote crate part 4

We’ve been blown away by the performance of our Gen 3 Coyote—and this is coming from someone who does a lot of Coyote engine dyno testing. Back in the Gen 1 Coyote days, it took fully worked heads and a decent amount of compression to make over 600 hp and we’ve achieved that without cracking the head bolts loose. Most recently we made 592 hp with new Stage II Comp NSR camshafts and our goal was over 600 hp before we installed our MPR Engines ported heads. Getting the air in and out of an engine efficiently as possible is the name of the game when it comes to making horsepower, so we asked Bret Barber from Air Flow Solutions to send over one of his ported ’18 and Cobra Jet…

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