ZINIO logo
ONTDEKKENBIBLIOTHEEK
Boten & Vliegtuigen
Classic Boat

Classic Boat February 2018

Admire the world's most beautiful boats, brought to life through breath-taking photography. Classic Boat offers a unique blend of yacht reviews, seamanship and restoration features, history and design columns, practical advice and coverage of the leading international regattas and events. Whether your interest lies in working on restoration projects or sailing in classic regattas; whether you're a wooden boat owner or simply an admirer of traditional marine workmanship, Classic Boat will have something for you.

Meer lezen
Land:
United Kingdom
Taal:
English
Uitgever:
Chelsea Magazine
Verschijningsfrequentie:
Monthly
EDITIE KOPEN
€ 6,06(Incl. btw)
ABONNEREN
€ 48,60(Incl. btw)
12 Edities

in deze editie

1 min.
going for a song

A key part of Classic Boat’s aim in life is to encourage new owners. This issue we launch a new series highlighting the many types of old wooden boats on the market for ‘affordable’ prices. What that means is of course subjective, but our ‘affordable classic’ each month will never cost more than £10k and there will always be others available for less. While you can find a mirror-finish Folkboat around the £10k mark, you can also find one with ‘attention needed’ for less than what most commuters in the UK pay for an annual train ticket. Believe me, the boat gives more fun. Our first ‘affordable classic’ is the Stella, on page 74. We hope it provides inspiration. Meanwhile, this month also sees our Classic Boat Awards shortlist revealed.…

11 min.
saving my grandad’s 7-m

When the so-called ‘gulasch baron’ Valdemar Henckel suffered his second major bankruptcy in 1921, he almost took the Danish town of Kalundsborg down with him. His shipyard there had grown to huge proportions, and the local bank couldn’t sustain the loss. After a lengthy trial, his assets were put up for auction to repay creditors, but there were two critical omissions from the list of lots. Neither of his two racing 7-Metre yachts were named – they had quietly disappeared. Victoria II was never found, but four years later in 1925, Victoria I showed up in the name of Henckel’s son-in-law. The gulasch baron had found a way to keep his gravy boat. Victoria I had been built in a hurry at Henckel’s shipyard, as a way to bring him into the…

9 min.
tell tales

FRANCE Safety doubts leave Golden Globe hanging 12 CLASSIC BOAT FEBRUARY 2018 Tell Tales Classic Boat’s address: Jubilee House, 2 Jubilee Place, London, SW3 3TQ cb@classicboat.co.uk The future of the Golden Globe Race 2018 was in doubt as we went to press, after concerns raised by the French Sailing Federation, FFV. The FFV made a surprise intervention as the race's organisers were preparing for a major press conference at the Paris Boat Show in December. It cast doubt over whether or not the race could start from Les Sables d'Olonne in Brittany. It was the latest in a series of setbacks for the race, that aims, like the original Sunday Times Golden Globe Race of 1968/9, to send solo sailors around the world non-stop, south of the three great capes on small, long-keeled yachts,…

2 min.
q& a

Peter Wilson of Davey & Co How is the market for traditional fittings in 2018? Very good, although to pick one year is deceptive. Over the last 10 years we have experienced positive growth but not always year on year. The key element for us is our distributors around the world. We are now at nearly 50 per cent export. What is the oldest pattern you use? Many items from our first proper catalogue in 1919 are still in production today but, of course, patterns are replicated because either more are needed to speed production, or they break or wear out. Many are from the first half of the 20th century and even those replaced more recently are to exactly the same design as before. What is the history of Davey & Co? Christopher Davey founded…

9 min.
sailing her home

Like a sorcerer, the owner of a boat that’s right feels he is in possession of a magic wand. With her in his hands he can tack up a tight channel in which others mis-fetch, he can steal a passage others burn fuel to make, he can weave a wake others can only follow. For me this has come true, because after more than 15 years of pursuit, the tiller of Betty II is now my magic wand and already I am spellbound at her turn of speed, directional stability and ease of driving, having recently sailed her from Keyhaven on the Solent back to my home at Leigh-on-Sea in the Thames Estuary, where she was built in 1921. This humble little gaffer is, quite literally, the only inanimate object I have…

2 min.
the value of nelson

When the chair in which Nelson contemplated his fate on the eve of Trafalgar came up at auction, it was estimated to fetch £30,000-50,000. At the time (in CB353) your humble correspondent wrote: “It may fetch a lot more.” Well, blow me if didn’t go on to fetch a whopping £106,250 at Bonhams. This is the leather armchair that was a love token from Nelson’s mistress Lady Emma Hamilton. Known simply as ‘the Emma’, it resided in Nelson’s cabin aboard HMS Victory and is one of the more resonant of his personal artefacts. It also proved a shrewd investment, because when previously sold at auction in 1980 it had fetched £1,320. Each year, around the anniversary of the naval hero’s death on October 21, there’s a flurry of market activity in the…