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Classic Toy Trains

Classic Toy Trains

March 2020

CLASSIC TOY TRAINS BRINGS YOU O AND S GAUGE FOR THE OPERATOR AND COLLECTOR. SEE THE NEWEST TRAINS FROM LIONEL, MTH, ATLAS O AND OTHERS; LEARN ABOUT TRACK PLANNING, WIRING AND LAYOUT CONSTRUCTION; IDENTIFY AND REPAIR OLD LIONEL AND AMERICAN FLYER TRAINS; AND VISIT THE MOST INSPIRING TOY TRAIN LAYOUTS EVER BUILT.

Land:
United States
Taal:
English
Uitgever:
Kalmbach Publishing Co. - Magazines
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9 Edities

In deze editie

2 min.
realism is in the eye of the beholder

When you think of toy trains, do you think of realism? Twenty years ago, my answer would have been a firm “No.” In the intervening decades, though, I’ve seen and learned some things that have shifted my opinion. It might be a matter of semantics, but “toy trains” really predate “model railroading” as a concept. First, there were trains that were moved by hand that were primarily meant for children. Once the miniature (relatively speaking) electric motor came along, and households were electrified, the needle really started to move toward “realism.” Scale O gauge models came to exist, and the pastime of “running trains” evolved into a hobby. Al Kalmbach’s first trains were O gauge and ran on three rails. They were also very rudimentary, but ultimately, made up a railroad. Locomotives and…

1 min.
do you have a story?

TO SUBMIT AN ARTICLE and photos, email to manuscripts@classictoytrains.com, or send materials to Classic Toy Trains, 21027 Crossroads Circle, P.O. Box 1612, Waukesha, WI 53186. Write the words “Manuscript Enclosed” on the envelope. Before preparing an article, contact us to determine interest. Article/photo guidelines are available at CTT.trains.com. If you are a manufacturer or supplier and would like to see your products in Product News or Reviews, email information and photos to editor@classictoytrains.com. Classic Toy Trains assumes letters, new product information, and other unsolicited materials are contributed gratis. We assume no responsibility for the safe return of unsolicited material.…

1 min.
classic toy trains

William Zuback Photography Supervisor Sue Hollinger-Klahn Production Specialist Lori Schneider Ad Sales Manager Martha Stanczak Ad Sales Representative Mike Ferguson Ad Sales Representative Trains.com A. David Popp Executive Producer Kent Johnson Producer Kalmbach Media Dan Hickey Chief Executive Officer Christine Metcalf Senior Vice President, Finance Nicole McGuire Senior Vice President, Consumer Marketing Stephen C. George Vice President, Content Brian J. Schmidt Vice President, Operations Sarah A. Horner Vice President, Human Resources David T. Sherman Senior Director, Advertising Sales and Events Scott Redmond Advertising Sales Director Liz Runyon Circulation Director Michael Soliday Director of Design and Production Lisa A. Bergman Managing Design Director Cathy Daniels New Business Manager Kathy Steele Retention Manager Kim Redmond Single Copy Specialist…

2 min.
model railroading is fun

As this is written, Christmas has not yet happened, and I’m a little introspective. As turbulent as the world is today, toy trains are, for many of us, a calming diversion. For others, they are much more than that – a place to let the imagination roam. Model railroading is fun. Seems obvious, eh? But many hobbyists in all scales strive for perfection – as they see it. This may be an exquisitely detailed layout based on a certain city, or railroad, or even a year. Locomotives and rolling stock are era-appropriate, and if the layout models the 1950s, you won’t find a Ford Mustang in a corner. For others it may be a railroad that isn’t leaning toward realism or detail, but instead toward a time and place where they lived…

3 min.
photo album

PAUL OGIN’S O GAUGE LAYOUT Most model railroaders prefer to spend many years building a single layout they consider their masterpiece. Veteran O gauge hobbyist Paul Ogin takes a very different approach: “I’ve been changing my layouts for more than 35 years,” he explains. “I get new ideas and can’t wait to tear one layout down and start a new one!” Luckily for us, Paul slowed down long enough from his labors in Wapwallopen, Pa., to snap a Union Pacific Electro-Motive SD70ACe from MTH Electric Trains passing a campsite on his latest display. NATIONAL TOY TRAIN MUSEUM’S WIDE GAUGE DISPLAY With many operating layouts to enjoy, visitors to the National Toy Train Museum in Strasburg, Pa., can be excused if they miss the historical displays along the walls. Still, everyone should check them…

1 min.
details make the difference

Details go a long way in adding realism to your O or S gauge layout. A few strategically placed people, benches, and clutter can make scenes come to life. A couple of years ago, MR Video Plus built an O gauge project railroad called the City Terminal & Transfer Railway. Episode 15: “Details-o-Plenty,” with hosts David Popp and Jenny Freeland, covers a number of easy-to-do scenery projects. In addition to showing how to place figures in scenes, David shares a neat tip for leveling the feet of unbalanced figures. Each item is thoughtfully placed into a scene. For example, one of the structures has debris next to it, so Jenny adds two men carrying garbage cans nearby. Need a way to quickly add a bunch of road stripes? David has suggestions for those too,…