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category_outlined / Eten & Wijn
Eat WellEat Well

Eat Well Issue #25 2019

A sexy Recipe Mag that has a healthy approach to good food. Taste every page as you flick through – delicious! Why bother? Because everything in here is good for you, easy, and yum. We know you are busy so we give you everything you need to eat well – recipes, shopping lists, quick ideas. You’re tapping in to a heap of wisdom from passionate chefs, bloggers and caring home cooks. You can share yours too – we’re a community. Life’s short…. outsource your food plan to people who love healthy good food. If you stopped buying recipe mags years ago because they’re full of things you can’t eat – then try Eat Well! Over 70 recipes per edition. Purchase includes the Digital Edition and News Service. Please stay in touch via our Facebook Page.

Land:
Australia
Taal:
English
Uitgever:
Universal Wellbeing PTY Limited
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6 Edities

IN DEZE EDITIE

access_time1 min.
lasagne

Think of lasagne and you immediately think of the wonderful cuisine of Italy — but you might have to think again. In fact, the origins of lasagne can be traced back to ancient Greece and the Greek word laganon, the first known form of pasta. Laganon was not what we would recognise as lasagne but certainly did feature layers of flat pasta with sauce. The next step in lasagne’s journey still does not take us to Italy as the first recipe for what is a modern-type lasagne dates to a British cookbook from the 1390s. Aside from these surprising origins, though, it is the Italians who have spent generations perfecting the dish featuring layered pasta sheets alternated with tomatoes, vegetables, sauce, meats and cheese.…

access_time1 min.
mocha

Mocha was not always a term that referred to coffee made with added chocolate. In the early days of global coffee trading in the early 1600s, Yemen was one of the first countries to cultivate coffee plants to satisfy the love of coffee that spice traders had developed. The main port of Yemen is Mokha (or Mocha) and coffees leaving that port were called Mocha coffees. Compared to the fruity flavours of the African and Indonesian coffees of the time, the Yemeni beans yielded a more chocolatey flavour. At that time, in the 17th century, these chocolatey beans were thought to blend very well when paired with beans from Java. Across the centuries the term “mocha” morphed into being a stand-in for coffee made with chocolate while “java” became a…

access_time2 min.
from the editor

Humans love a list. I say that with some confidence and if you care to dispute the issue I refer you to the splatter of “listicles” that dominates everything from the internet to newspapers and magazines. Aside from being a bitter pill for lovers of the English language, a “listicle” is an article in the form of a list. Bloggers, editors and click-baiters alike love listicles because they suit the stereotype of the modern reader: someone who is time-poor, self-absorbed and has the attention span of an aphid. Listicles are thought to suit that reader because they are predictable in format, easy to skim and easy to put down and they break whatever the issue is into digestible (sometimes trivialised) chunks. I think we could add that any “list” also promises some sort of…

access_time1 min.
give us foodback

We want your foodback: EatWell is all about building a sharing community of people who care about the origins, quality and enjoyment of our food, so we want to hear from you. Let us know how you have found some of the recipes you have made from this issue, share the improvements you might have made, or even send us one of your own favourite recipes. We will publish as many of your insights and contributions as we can. Send your foodback to Kate at kduncan@umco.com.au…

access_time1 min.
eat well

EDITOR Terry Robson DEPUTY EDITOR Kate Duncan SUB-EDITOR Kerry Boyne ASSISTANT EDITOR Sophie Flecknoe DESIGNER Natasha Michels FEATURE WRITERS Cat Woods, Lisa Holmen, Ally McManus, Nikki Davies CHEFS Adam Guthrie, Meg Thompson, Jacqueline Alwill, Danielle Minnebo, Georgia Harding, Alexx Stuart, Lisa Guy, Lee Holmes NATIONAL ADVERTISING MANAGER NSW Nia Llewelyn Ph +61 488 267 371 QUEENSLAND ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Regan Hudson Ph +61 411 424 356 NATIONAL ADVERTISING MANAGER VIC Tracey Dwyer Ph +61 3 9694 6403 ADVERTISING PRODUCTION CO-ORDINATOR Leesa Hughes Ph +61 2 9887 0354 ADVERTISING ART DIRECTOR Martha Rubazewicz PUBLISHER Janice Williams COVER PHOTO Danielle Minnebo CHAIRMAN/CEO Prema Perera PUBLISHER Janice Williams CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Vicky Mahadeva ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Emma Perera FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION MANAGER James Perera CIRCULATION BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER Mark McTaggart CREATIVE DIRECTOR Kate Podger MARKETING & ACQUISITIONS MANAGER Chelsea Peters…

access_time9 min.
our chefs

Adam Guthrie Adam is a vegan whose passion for food began with a life-threatening illness and continues today in a lifestyle built around healthy cooking and eating. Adam is a qualified chef and wellness coach who specialises in a wholefood, plant-based diet. He is a passionate advocate for living a simple, healthy and environmentally friendly life. His story begins with a rude awakening when, as an out-of-balance and overweight 39-year-old, he found himself in hospital after an early-morning surf, discovering he’d had a heart attack and being told by his cardiologist that he would be on daily medications for the rest of his life. Adam didn’t accept that his cardiologist’s “solution” of daily medication was the only way of minimising his risk of another heart attack. Instead, he decided he would do everything…

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