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EatingWell

EatingWell

January/February 2021

What's for dinner? Is it healthy? Is it easy? If you ask these questions, Eating Well is for you. The magazine "Where Good Taste Meets Good Health," Eating Well delivers the information and inspiration you need to make healthy eating a way of life with great, easy recipes (most take 45 minutes or less), the latest nutrition science, gorgeous photos and crisp, evocative prose.

Meer lezen
Land:
United States
Taal:
English
Uitgever:
Meredith Corporation
Verschijningsfrequentie:
Bimonthly
EDITIE KOPEN
€ 4,44(Incl. btw)
ABONNEREN
€ 8,87(Incl. btw)
10 Edities

in deze editie

3 min.
habits for better health

Healthy for life.” It’s the theme that runs through many of the stories in this issue. What does it mean? My definition: having the energy and stamina to do the things you love with the people you love for the majority of your life. There are plenty of reasons—genetic, systemic and otherwise—why this can’t be a reality for everyone. But if we could all wave a magic wand and make it so, wouldn’t we? My answer is a resounding “yes.” But since I lack that wand there are two things I prioritize to try to make the aspiration a reality: cooking and exercise. In the photo below, I’m at the CrossFit gym in Shelburne, Vermont. When I started there, the coach explained that it was all about constant change. The mix…

2 min.
what’s trending on eatingwell.com

1 15-Minute Meals Preparing a delicious dinner is easy with our recipes that take just minutes to make. Start with these BBQ Chicken Tacos with Red Cabbage Slaw (left). EatingWell.com/15MinMeals 2 Go Mediterranean Get our best Mediterranean-style recipes so you can follow one of the healthiest ways of eating. We even have a 30-Day Mediterranean Diet Challenge to help you make it a habit. EatingWell.com/MediterraneanDiet 3 Dry January Considering a booze-free month? Read our article “What Happens to Your Body When You Quit Drinking.” You might be surprised by all the perks! EatingWell.com/DryJanuary Q WE ASKED YOU: What health goals do you have this year? To be more present. —kimberly.w.kauffman.5 Listening to my body! Not every workout needs to be a killer sweat fest—and that’s OK! —emmahaynes10 Drink more water. —jonna62 My goal is to continue my…

1 min.
bubbles with benefits

FRESH IDEAS FOR EVERY DAY Sinking into a tub at the end of a long day can do wonders for your mental well-being. But your heart? Yes, it can help with that, too, according to a small but growing number of studies. Perhaps most notably, recent research published in the journal Heart looked at 30,000 middle-aged adults over a 19-year period and found that those who took a bath most days of the week lowered their risk of developing cardiovascular disease by 28% and reduced their odds of stroke by 26%. Scientists think that baths are good for your heart because the heat from the water improves long-term vascular function—not unlike the way exercise does (though we don’t recommend trading your sweat session for a soak session). If a daily bath…

3 min.
what are adaptogens—and do they really have health benefits?

Adaptogens are said to boost the body’s natural ability to handle stress by, as the name suggests, adapting to meet its needs. By that logic, this group of more than 70 plants brings balance the way a thermostat controls temperature: they turn up your energy when you’re fatigued and help you relax when you’re restless. They’re also purported to address issues as disparate as trouble focusing, headaches, dry eye, high blood pressure and even cancer. While the term “adaptogen” wasn’t coined until 1940, they have been used for centuries in ayurvedic and traditional Chinese medicine. The most widely marketed adaptogens include ashwagandha, rhodiola, holy basil, ginseng, maca, and reishi and cordyceps mushrooms. They’re sold as supplements, teas, tinctures and “superfood” powders, foods and juices. With the events of the past year…

3 min.
"don't yuck my yum"

We all attach stigmas to food—intentionally or not. Those snacks? “Bad!” These snacks? “Good!” That vegetable? “Gross.” This vegetable? “Yummy! But these judgments can have a real impact on those around us. “Food is deeply emotional and cultural,” says Morgan McGhee, M.P.H., R.D., director of school nutrition leadership at FoodCorps, a national nonprofit that connects kids to healthy food in schools. When someone categorizes a food as “weird” or “bad,” it can make others—anyone who eats that food often—feel ashamed, embarrassed or stigmatized. McGhee is working with schools nationwide to change the conversation around food. She says she’ll never forget one particular exchange with a Latino high school student: “He said his nutrition goal for the month was ‘To eat white people’s food.’ When I asked him what that meant, he said…

3 min.
doggone bored?

Getting your pup out to stretch his legs can be a tall order on those bitterly cold days when you need to bundle up just to get from your house to the car, never mind going for a long stroll in the park. By tapping into his innate playfulness, curiosity and eagerness to please, there are many ways to keep your dog moving—and mentally stimulated—from the comfort of your (far cozier) home. And when it comes right down to it, that’s what he’s most excited for: quality fun time with his favorite human. • Chew on This Chewing is a natural way to combat boredom, alleviate anxiety and keep your pup’s teeth strong and clean. With so many different options to choose from, sussing out which chew toys best suit your…