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frankie Magazinefrankie Magazine

frankie Magazine March/April 2018

frankie Magazine is an Australian bi-monthly with a difference. A niche-style title with mainstream appeal – filled with fashion, art, craft, music, cuteness and real-life inspiration – frankie is dedicated to uncovering the newest trends, celebrating the latest creative talents and delivering sharp, honest, laugh-out-loud stories their readers can relate to.

Land:
Australia
Taal:
English
Uitgever:
Nextmedia Pty Ltd
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6 Edities

IN DEZE EDITIE

access_time1 min.
we love words around these parts.

Big words. Small words. Words that read the same backwards and forwards. Obscure words that we’ve never heard before. (Turn to page 110 if you’d like to know what ‘borborygmus’ means, for instance.) But however much we like words – and this issue, as ever, is full of them, so you know we do – there’s one pairing we’re not quite so fond of: ‘guilty pleasure’. The thrown-about phrase suggests something that brings you joy should actually be kept on the down low, lest you cause others to smirk and titter at your expense. A cheesy daytime soap you’ve come to love. Instant powdered coffee sipped from a souvenir mug. Staying in your pajamas all day because you can’t be arsed choosing an outfit. Having spent countless hours scoffing MILO straight from…

access_time3 min.
dear frankie

Dear frankie, After an incredible, bewildering year of all-consuming full-time uni, I've found myself in the quiet holiday aftermath, stumbling around and trying to regain a sense of identity, purpose and creativity in my days. What a relief and pleasure it was to be reminded of people like Joel and Rachel Cooper, who pursue richness of life with such a gentle yet constant passion. Reading about and seeing their love of fun, nature and art in your pages was just the kickstart I needed to re-find the "joyful chaos" and colour in my own life. Thank you, thank you, thank you. Love, Ellie x Dear frankie, One of my favourite things about you is your beautiful and unique posters. Opening issue 81, I was expecting some sort of Christmas-y piece, but…

access_time17 min.
frank bits

vege threads intimates Are you in the market for some knickers with an ecologically friendly bent? Organic clothing aficionados Vege Threads have released a new range of undergarments that are 100 per cent plant-dyed, and made from end-roll and scrap cotton as well. Ranging from $39 to $79, they’re a little on the pricey side, but they’ll certainly earn you some environmental brownie points. (Greenie points, maybe?) vegethreads.com scrunch time The nice types at Moon Picnic won’t stop fooling around with coloured paper and turning it into cool stuff, no matter how many adult responsibilities pile on their plates. Their latest sweet-as idea? Paper ice-cream placemats! Use them to stop dribbles, then scrunch them into seven scrummy flavours – it’s as easy as that. Find them in packs of 21 at moonpicnic.com for…

access_time3 min.
hidden mothers

Photography was a complicated business in the early days. Aside from all the camera twiddling required to get an exposure just right, the subject also had to sit perfectly still for a minute or more to achieve a sharp image. Add a wriggly kid to that mix and, without some careful parental management, you’d end up with little more than a blur for a memory. In the 19th century, photographers devised a peculiar solution to this conundrum: keep mum in shot, but chuck a sheet over her to hide her. New Mexico artist Megan Jacobs first discovered this odd bit of history via Linda Fregni Nagler’s book, The Hidden Mother. It’s a collection of historical baby portraits, each with a strange human lump lurking in the background – a mother crouched…

access_time3 min.
my favourite things...

Favourite thing about being in a family band: We’ve been doing it for such a long time that it just feels normal, and we’re all really used to each other. We play different instruments and swap around a lot, but we play them in our own ways – me and Lewis both play guitar, the three of us all play drums, but we’re all very different. So, if I’m writing a song, I can picture who can bring what to the table, and everyone’s got their own skills. It keeps the music interesting. Favourite karaoke go-to: One of my funniest memories of karaoke is me and Daisy doing Salt-n-Pepa’s “Let’s Talk About Sex”. We were on the Brighton Pier, really drunk, and we just got up – I don’t know why…

access_time3 min.
science of boozing

As any barfly will tell you, humans have a complex relationship with alcohol – but what they may not tell you (either because they don’t know or they’re too busy wailing misremembered Red Hot Chili Peppers lyrics at the general public) is that we’ve actually been getting pissed since before we were even human. Our closest primate relatives, chimpanzees and gorillas, were getting wasted on the yeast in over-ripe fruit some 10 million years ago, and in doing so, loading up on lots of extra calories. This gave the tree-dwelling creatures a distinct advantage when it came to nabbing food in the forest – few other animals can tolerate alcohol. Not only can humans tolerate it, but our form of ADH4 – aka the enzyme in our system that prevents alcohol…

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