ONTDEKKENBIBLIOTHEEK
Handwerk
Garden Railways

Garden Railways June 2018

TAKE YOUR MODEL TRAINS OUTDOORS! GARDEN RAILWAYS MAGAZINE WILL HELP YOU MAKE YOUR BACKYARD COME ALIVE. EVERY ISSUE IS PACKED WITH TIPS ON DESIGNING AND LANDSCAPING YOUR RAILWAY, REVIEWS OF LOCOMOTIVES AND OTHER NEW PRODUCTS – EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW TO CREATE YOUR OWN OUTDOOR RAILWAY.

Land:
United States
Taal:
English
Uitgever:
Kalmbach Publishing Co. - Magazines
Meer lezen
EDITIE KOPEN
€ 6,95(Incl. btw)
ABONNEREN
€ 32,79(Incl. btw)
4 Edities

in deze editie

2 min.
us garden-railroading history

Since the late 1970s I have been a member of a British organization, the 16mm Narrow Gauge Modellers Association. They are garden railroaders much like us in the US. The hobby there is approached differently than it is here. For one thing, most of their narrow-gauge railways are two-foot gauge (or thereabout), while ours are mostly three foot. Those differences, however, are not the subject of this editorial, just a point of reference. Within the past few years, a subgroup within the 16mm Association has taken a greater interest in their own history, primarily commercial and semi-commercial, through what is being called the 16mm Heritage Locomotive Owners and Operators Association. This got me thinking about the history of garden railroading in the US, at least since 1968. That’s when LGB, celebrating…

4 min.
notes & news

PRODUCTS Engines & rolling stock LGB (Märklin) is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year and the company has released a commemorative “Stainz” steam locomotive in a special paint scheme (#L20216, $289.99) and five addon 50th Anniversary cars. These are two-axle boxcars decorated in special paint, with metal wheelsets and opening side doors. Each car is imprinted with the most beautiful models for the designated 10-year period, as follows: 1968-1978 (#L40501), 1978-1988 (#L40502, shown top), 1988-1998 (#L40503), 1998-2008 (#L40504), and 2008-2018 (#L40505). Price for each car: $149.99. Also from LGB is a Wolfgang Richter mail car (# L32191) as a tribute to the founder of LGB G-scale trains on the occasion of the company’s 50th anniversary. This car is painted and lettered to go with the Wolfgang Richter Stainz locomotive, and features interior details,…

3 min.
letters

Photography I read your editorial on photography in the April issue of Garden Railways and wanted to share a photo with you that I took of my station on the Bagley Mountain Division of the Maine Central Railroad (at right). I took this photo with a point-and-shoot digital camera, a Fuji XP waterproof job (I do a lot of canoeing and kayaking). Many people think it is a photo of a real station. It is a slightly modified (with signage) Pola model. I’ve named my railroad the Bagley Mountain Division of the Maine Central (MEC) because I grew up on a farm that the MEC ran through when I was a kid. I was influenced by the name of the Mountain Division of the Maine Central Railroad, which runs through the White…

1 min.
video 101

Assembling a video timeline I’m using a video of Jim Cunningham’s Cumbres & Toltec 1939 railroad to show video timeline creation in postproduction editing. In my software, the timeline is along the bottom of the window. I circled it in yellow in the photo shown. This is where all the components come together. From the Titles Library I have created a title for Jim’s railroad when we show our video to the visitors at the Children’s Museum. Video and still images are drawn from the Media Libraries and are assembled along the timeline. I can move them easily into sequence. I like to start with a wide shot to help orient the viewer, then intersperse closeups to identify people and details. Closeups help keep our video from becoming a moving panorama of distant…

7 min.
keep your stock rolling smoothly

Friction is the primary impediment to free-rolling wheels. Newtonian physics states that “an object at rest tends to stay at rest,” also called the law of inertia. If an object isn’t moving, it will want to stay not moving until something tries to move it. In this issue I’m going to discuss what it takes to keep our trains’ wheels moving, and some things we can do to make them roll easier in specific situations. There are three types of friction: static, sliding, and rolling (figure 1). Static friction (sometimes called “stiction”) is the force that must be overcome before a stationary object will begin to move. In the case of our trains, it’s the amount of pull the locomotive must exert on the train to get the wheels to just…

4 min.
operations outdoors

Operations on model railroads simulate the type of full-size railroading that gets work done—moving cargo and passengers. “Ops” in the garden railway extend the social appeal of your yard, giving folks a fun activity. This introduction outlines various railway jobs, such as engineer, dispatcher, and yardmaster. Guests graduate from passive spectators to interactive workers while playing on the same team. Some of us are retrofitting our existing railways to enable ops sessions. Stan and Deb Ames, along with a crew of dozens of operators, have refined the art of railroad operations for 30 years (photo 1). I’m indebted to Stan for helping me put together this story by defining job positions on their SJR&P Railway in Massachusetts. The crew tells their stories in the Regional reports. You can read extended reports…