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Reizen & Outdoor
Kruger Magazine

Kruger Magazine

Autumn 2020

Few parts of the world can match the Greater Kruger Lowveld for its wildlife, natural and cultural diversity or the unique customer experience it offers to each visitor to this iconic region. Our targeted content is produced by leading journalists, photographers, videographers and graphic designers. We also draw on resources of a domestic and international network of expert contributors. Seasonally themed quarterly issues offer exciting information and content. The KRUGER MAGAZINE’s impressively broad editorial mix will offer engaging reading and satisfy not only the avid wildlife lover, adventurer, passionate photographer and domestic and international tourist, but also conservationists, researchers, and armchair travellers, amongst others. The KRUGER MAGAZINE offers essential content for anyone with a passion for wildlife who wants to understand and experience Africa’s Greater Kruger – a celebration of Africa’s GREATER KRUGER!

Land:
South Africa
Taal:
English
Uitgever:
MLP Media Pty Ltd
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4 Edities

in deze editie

2 min.
from the publisher’s pen

KRUGER MAGAZINE was launched in June 2017 on our private Facebook page. The first quarterly issue was published in September 2017 as both interactive print and interactive digital editions. The private Facebook group has been developed to fully integrate with this quarterly publication. The team strives to offer engaging content and satisfy not only the avid wildlife lover, adventurer, passionate photographer and domestic and international tourist, but also conservationists, researchers and armchair travellers. We are privileged to have secured the involvement of wildlife and conservation experts since the inception. Some of the expert writers have had the privilege of working in the Kruger National Park for many years, even decades. Our combined passion for wildlife and dedication to create a quality reader and member experience, culminated in the team being recognised for our media…

1 min.
makuleke

The Makuleke community used to live where the Limpopo and Luvhuvu Rivers meet in South Africa with Zimbabwe and Mozambique. In 1969 they lost their land under apartheid legislation but regained it 29 years later. Instead of resettling, they turned this biodiversity hotspot into a contract park within the Kruger National Park and it is now managed jointly with SANParks. The Makuleke Contractual Park or Pafuri Triangle, constitutes the northernmost section of the Kruger National Park, and comprises approximately 240km2 of land. “Only when our natural and cultural resources are well kept, will we be able to transfer knowledge, skills and business opportunities to our children. This is why we can now turn our creative talents and rich cultural heritage into products that we proudly present at outlets in and around the national parks of…

7 min.
the business of dwarf mongooses

species “The major is that difference the common between has the carnassia two l Ethiopian molars (meat ’s molars -slicing are teeth heavier ) w , hile perh the aps better adapted for crushing.” In Africa there are two species of dwarf mongoose in the genus Helogale. 1 The common dwarf mongoose (Helogale parvula) occurs widely in the southern and eastern parts of Africa. 2 The Ethiopian dwarf mongoose (Helogale hirtula) is found in Kenya, Somalia and Ethiopia, though there is some overlap in their ranges. These are probably evolutionary adaptations to differences in the respective diets available to the two species. Dr Ian John Whyte is an independent environmental consultant who retired from SANParks in 2007. He was previously engaged in full-time wildlife research in Kruger National Park from 1970-2007. At the time of…

7 min.
bateleurs

The French author, explorer and naturalist François Levaillant gave the bateleur both its scientific and common names. Terathopius ecaudatus, reportedly meaning ‘marvellous face, without tail’, is both appropriate and descriptive. The bright scarlet of the facial skin, which contrasts starkly with the yellow and black bill, could easily be described as marvellous, while in its adult form, the bird has almost no tail. Dr Ian John Whyte is an independent environmental consultant who retired from SANParks in 2007. He was previously engaged in full-time wildlife research in Kruger National Park from 1970-2007. At the time of retirement, he was responsible for the coordination of all research projects pertaining to elephant, buffalo and other large herbivores and rare antelope. He is a member of the IUCN’s Species Survival Commission’s African Elephant Specialist Group.…

7 min.
mahlometela kruger on foot

Ralf Kalwa is an Ecological Consultant at Malelane, a position he has held since December 2001. He established Rhengu Environmental Services in the Malelane area and is trails leader for the Lebombo Eco Trail. Prior to holding this position, Ralf was Manager: IEM: Kruger National Park from 2000-2001 and Senior Section Ranger: Kruger National Park from 1994-2000. “Every ranger in Kruger gets a Shangaan name, given to him by his staff and fellow field rangers,” says Ralf. “Mine is Mahlometela… the man who sees everything.” The majority of visitors to the Kruger National Park (KNP) arrive in a variety of modes of transport and cruise along the hundreds of kilometres through the many landscapes searching for memorable sightings. They often wonder what hidden treasures are lurking behind the no entry roads,…

5 min.
apple-leaf trees & rain tree bugs

Nick Zambatis was the former Manager: Biodiversity Conservation in Conservation Management: Kruger National Park. He retired in 2016. His first job in the Kruger was as a research technician based at Skukuza, which he started in 1987. “The transfer from Pretoria to the Lowveld was ecstasy and the Kruger appointment was a dream come true,” he recalls. He holds an MSc degree on the determinants of grass composition and production in the Kruger National Park, from the University of KwaZulu-Natal. General description Commonly known as apple-leaf (‘appelblaar’ in Af rikaans, ‘mbhandzu’ in Tsonga, ‘mufhanda’ in Venda and Philenoptera violacea to botanists), this tree also has the less common but interesting name of ‘rain tree’. ‘Philenoptera’ is derived from the Greek words meaning ‘tractable wings’, referring to the winged pods that allow for…