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Films, TV & Muziek
SFX

SFX February 2020

SFX is the world's leading sci-fi, horror and fantasy magazine. Covering all areas of the genre across TV, movies, books, games, collectables and comics, every month SFX delivers news, features, exclusive Q&As, behind-the-scenes stories, star profiles and TV episode guides. Recently redesigned to reflect the growing mainstream popularity of sci-fi, now you can read our Hollywood news, TV celebrity interviews and top columnists on your computer or mobile device, thanks to Zinio.

Land:
United Kingdom
Taal:
English
Uitgever:
Future Publishing Ltd
Verschijningsfrequentie:
Monthly
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13 Edities

in deze editie

1 min.
captain’s log

“I have no desire to have fun.” Star Trek, as I’ve said before, is what brought me to the world of SFX. Way, way back in the days when a group of sci-fi fans in Edinburgh watched imported video cassettes of new episodes – including the Voyager pilot in fancy NTSC black and white conversion, no less – I picked up issue one of this very magazine while on my way to a Star Trek local group meeting. A quarter of a century later we’re all still going strong, thankfully, and my love for both Star Trek and SFX is bigger than ever. I’ll admit that Enterprise didn’t really hold my attention at the time, but my love for Voyager has never wavered – so I genuinely lost any attempt at “cool”…

1 min.
first contact

DEAD AND LOVING IT Neil Hickman, email I’ve seen a fair few different versions of Stoker’s famous bloodsucker, but the Sherlock-esque remix of Dracula stands out. It’s been an absolute blast. Loved Sister Agatha and that last minute twist in episode two was crazy. So many cool touches: Mina pulling a Jigsaw; stop-motion, death-craving undead unfolding from boxes; the convent scene with the slayer nun army… Amazingly barmy and refreshing to even old fans who’ve seen it all. SFX It certainly went with a Bang. Check out our take on page 98. HOPELESS The Llama God, email The main crime that The Rise Of Skywalker commits is in undoing The Last Jedi’s message of hope. While that film suggests that anyone is capable of greatness no matter their background, Skywalker returns to the saga’s…

1 min.
red alert

4 min.
green fingers

SCI-FACT! The director’s sister, Tanja Hausner, was costume designer. “They worked on the aesthetic together,” says Beecham. WHEN JESSICA HAUSNER SET OUT TO MAKE a science fiction film, eyebrows were raised. After all, the 47-year-old Austrian is best known for such acclaimed arthouse projects as Lourdes (2009) and Amour Fou (2014), but as it turns out she has a secret love of genre cinema: films like Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey, the Alien saga and Duncan Jones’s Moon. She’ll even watch the odd chiller. “I very much like horror films,” she grins. Even so, bringing her own perspective to sci-fi was always going to conjure something off-kilter, and so it goes with Little Joe, her first English-language project. It’s the story of a scientist, Alice Woodard (Emily Beecham), who works for…

1 min.
rants & raves

SCI-FACT! Lara Croft was originally conceived as a bloke with a hat and a whip – sound familiar? DARREN SCOTT EDITOR RAVES Episode three of Dracula. Sacha Dhawan is absolutely wonderful as the Master. Now, if we can just bring back the Rani… RANTS Gutted that this means Sacha Dhawan can’t be the Doctor now. I didn’t feel emotional watching The Rise Of Skywalker. It looked great, but there was too much to wrap up. IAN BERRIMAN DEPUTY EDITOR RAVES Felt rather tricked by Dracula episode three… but I’ve thought about it a lot since, which is a good sign. Finally caught up with The Boys and loved it: edgy without being too crass. RANTS Doctor Who… “Spyfall” started well, then turned into gibberish. “Orphan 55” made me want to burn fossil fuels. JONATHAN COATES ART EDITOR RAVES Episode two of Worzel Gummidge was terrific. Twiggy…

1 min.
stamp duty

Iconic and influential UK games from the ’80s and ’90s get the Royal Mail, uh, stamp of approval this month. Nine franchises have been immortalised in the top right corner of letters from the UK – or framed in various presentation sets, available to buy now. Each getting their own stamp are: Elite; Dizzy; Populous; Lemmings; Micro Machines; Sensible Soccer; Wipeout and Worms. The evolution of Tomb Raider – and lead adventurer Lara Croft – gets a miniature sheet of four stamps. No love for Miner Willy, though. To order the stamps – and other collectibles – visit royalmail.com/videogames…