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Sports Illustrated

Sports Illustrated May 2020

Through emotional storytelling and award-winning photography, Sports Illustrated provides you with complete coverage of all your favorite sports, including the NFL, College Football, Baseball, College Basketball, the NBA and more.

Land:
United States
Taal:
English
Uitgever:
Meredith Corporation
Verschijningsfrequentie:
Monthly
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EDITIE KOPEN
€ 9,20(Incl. btw)
ABONNEREN
€ 35,93(Incl. btw)
16 Edities

in deze editie

2 min.
homestand

WHEN YOU publish a magazine for more than 65 years, once in a while you’ll need to get an issue out the door under less than ideal circumstances. In 2001, as the nation reeled from the September 11 terrorist attacks, we built an issue from scratch in the six days after the Twin Towers fell just a few miles south of our offices. In October 2012, we scrambled to finish an issue 24 hours ahead of deadline so that staffers could get home safely as Hurricane Sandy began to lash the New York area. (We might have moved up our schedule by a few hours more, but we had to wait to see whether the Giants would win the World Series that night. They did.) The May 2020 edition brought an unprecedented…

6 min.
home games

ASTRICT QUARANTINE is a good way to learn about your partner, and what Sara Hudson has learned is that her husband, Daniel, the Nationals’ closer, does not know how to use a Lysol wipe. “You have to do it for a good 20 seconds for it to work!” Sara says. Daniel tends to give the contents of a grocery bag one pass and then put them away. She laughs and says, “I’m just like, ‘I’ll do it.’]” As the coronavirus pandemic has spread across the globe, and the MLB season has been suspended, players are home, waiting out this uneasy period like the rest of us. They are frightened and unsettled. They are struggling to establish some sense of normalcy during the least normal stage of their lives. Some of them are…

2 min.
virtual sanity

ON THE afternoon of April 5, Heat center Meyers Leonard booted up his computer and logged on to the streaming site Twitch so fans could watch him play Call of Duty. By the time he logged off, almost 26 hours later, he had raised nearly $70,000 for Feeding America, a national organization of more than 200 food banks. Leonard is one of many athletes choosing to spend their suddenly massive amount of free time on Twitch. His marathon broadcast may have been a one-off charity effort, but streaming has become a major part of Leonard’s life during the NBA’s coronavirus-related interruption. The 7-footer, known on Twitch as the Hammer, has begun streaming daily, joining a long list of pro athletes expanding their reach on the platform. Leonard sees it as a way…

1 min.
sim jim

JIMMIE JOHNSON’S first foray into NASCAR’s virtual iRacing series last month did not go well. He was twice black-flagged before causing a giant wreck, all on national TV. “A comedy of errors,” he says. “I’m learning as I go.” His status as a noob was largely to blame, but so was his equipment. Johnson was “driving” a stock car on an open-wheel simulator. The seven-time champ has announced that this will be his last full-time NASCAR season (though he concedes that the abbreviated season might cause him to reconsider). So when he decided to buy a simulator for his house, he had an eye toward the future. “In ’21, I would love to reduce my racing down to a 10- to 15-race schedule,” Johnson says. “IndyCar is on the table.…

1 min.
2k = o.k.

NOT EVERY athlete turned to gaming as a way to connect with fans or hone their skill set. Some just wanted to have fun, satisfy a competitive fix—and maybe talk a little good-natured trash. Enter the first-ever NBA 2K Players Tournament, which featured 16 athletes and was televised by ESPN. Even in major blowouts, of which there were plenty, players seemed to enjoy themselves. Kings forward Harrison Barnes offered up a novel excuse after his Raptors lost 101–59 to the Bucks, who were controlled by Atlanta’s Trae Young: “I’m not gonna lie, Toronto must have had a back-to-back-to-back.” The finals were an all-Suns matchup, as Deandre Ayton was swept by Devin Booker. Ayton beat Patrick Beverley in the semis, but while the kid might have taught the vet a thing…

3 min.
clutch shot

GAMEPLAN: THE SMART FAN’S GUIDE TO RIGHT NOW SUNDAYS THROUGH MAY 17, ESPN ESPN’S SWEATILY anticipated documentary The Last Dance, an examination of the conclusion of the six-time champion Bulls dynasty, arrived right when the basketball-starved public needed it most. Originally scheduled for release in June, the beginning of the 10-episode series was moved up to April 19 to satisfy demand for entertainment while most of the country has been ordered to stay at home. At a time when people want fresh content to gobble up combined with the trappings of comfort (often in the form of nostalgia), The Last Dance is the perfect documentary for this moment. There was no way this project wasn’t going to be good. Not with the people involved. Michael Jordan. Phil Jackson. Dennis Rodman. Scottie Pippen. The…