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Sports Illustrated

Sports Illustrated March 2021

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Through emotional storytelling and award-winning photography, Sports Illustrated provides you with complete coverage of all your favorite sports, including the NFL, College Football, Baseball, College Basketball, the NBA and more.

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Land:
United States
Taal:
English
Uitgever:
Maven Coalition Inc.
Frequentie:
Monthly
EDITIE KOPEN
€ 8,91(Incl. btw)
ABONNEREN
€ 34,75(Incl. btw)
16 Edities

in deze editie

1 min.
snow big deal

3 min.
values and value

THE FIRST story in the first issue of Sports Illustrated—Aug. 16, 1954—was on the Miracle Mile, a showdown between Roger Bannister and John Landy, then the only two humans to run a mile in under four minutes. Both cracked 4:00 again, Bannister won it by a hair and the magazine ran a photo of the pair chatting on the track moments after. Just behind them, occupying a space usually reserved for insider types, stands a man in jacket and tie, soaking in the scene and the conversation. That man was Bob Schulman, one of two SI writers at the event—and while he no doubt figured he was just doing his job, he was blazing a trail that SI has followed ever since. To this day, we take our audience deeper inside…

8 min.
stream warriors

HERE’S A thought exercise. Imagine you’re a boxing ring announcer. Then consider the strain it would entail to keep the straight face required for legitimacy, as you say words to this effect: “In the corner to my right: He is 43 years old, weighs in at 147 pounds and brings an unblemished record of 50–0 …” “And in the corner to my left: He is 25 years of age, weighs 199 pounds and comes in with a record of 0–1 …” Such will be the task confronting some off-brand Michael Buffer soon, when Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Logan Paul finally flounce into the ring for what will be, by any measure—hype, buys, traffic—one of the biggest fights of 2021. Originally scheduled for Feb. 20, the fight has been postponed because of, in the…

1 min.
cool story

READ THE BONA FIDE LEGEND OF COOL PAPA BELL by Lonnie Wheeler Last December, MLB announced it was officially recognizing Negro leagues stats, a move that was long overdue but underscores a sad reality: Many Negro leagues records simply don’t exist, so we still will never know how Cool Papa Bell, who reputedly once swiped two bags on the same pitchout, compared with fellow outfielder Rickey Henderson, the all-time stolen base leader. In his book on Bell, Lonnie Wheeler (who died of cardiac arrest at age 68 last June) used that relative shortage of resources to his advantage. Many baseball biographies rely too heavily on numbers and day-to-day results. Wheeler instead turned Bell’s life into an actual story, and he crafts vivid scenes—some rollicking, some poignant—as Bell goes from working in a…

1 min.
balance of power

WHEN HE planned his shoot of Serena Williams for the cover of the 2019 Fashionable 50 issue, photographer Jeffery A. Salter sought to capture not only her athleticism but also her royal stature and her sense of high fashion. It wasn’t going to be easy. The shoot took place in London only days before Wimbledon, and Williams showed up hours late because of a back injury that required a trip to the doctor. (She would make the tournament final anyway.) Salter loved the idea of having Williams place one leg up on a column to appear regal, so much so that he asked his prop stylist to order six columns of differing heights to give himself options. “While I was doing the testing, everybody in the crew at one point…

14 min.
laps from grace

IN THE fall of 1999, the top men’s swimming coaches in college rolled through the Phoenix home of Kelly and Karen Keller. They were making their final recruiting pitches to the Kellers’ son, Klete, a strapping, 6' 6" freestyle phenom. But the visits were notably awkward. Jon Urbanchek, Michigan’s coach at the time, was in the Kellers’ home the night before national letter-of-intent signing day, and he’s never forgotten what Karen murmured to him. “Jon, you’re wasting your time,” he says she told him. “He’s never going to make it through college.” Urbanchek was taken aback. “This was stunning, coming from his mom,” Urbanchek says. “It was like they were giving up on him. He had a rough time at home.” Keller would sign with USC the following day, the next step in…