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category_outlined / Gezondheid & Fitness
Weight WatchersWeight Watchers

Weight Watchers September - October 2018

WW magazine is packed with recipes, tips, trends and ideas for living a delicious, healthy life! *Tasty WW friendly recipes *Inspiration and advice from WW members *The latest in wellness news

Land:
United States
Taal:
English
Uitgever:
Weight Watchers
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IN DEZE EDITIE

access_time2 min.
getting to know…simone dinnerstein

Pianist Brooklyn, NYAge: 46 / Lost: 20 lb*Member since: 2017 “My Coach gave me a great piece of advice: ‘When you’re traveling, enjoy the food, just less of it.’” I was a freelance musician in New York City for years, but I always dreamed of becoming a soloist. Classical musicians usually develop their careers through competitions, but I never felt confident playing in those situations. So in 2007, I went the indie route: I raised money for my first recording, which was Bach’s “Goldberg Variations.” I shopped it around to record labels—and it topped the classical music charts! I quickly became an international soloist. It’s exciting to perform around the world, but the travel, the lack of structure, and the social demands can be stressful. There are post-concert receptions, with drinks and dessert, and…

access_time1 min.
kids in the kitchen

As TV competitions like MasterChef Junior make clear, even preteens can whip up delicious eats. Such shows whet kids’ interest in cooking; so can shadowing you as you prepare family meals. For kids who want to delve more deeply? No need for culinary school just yet; opportunities abound for at-home training. Tailor the instruction to your children's natural preferences, then turn them loose (but always supervise young cooks, particularly around knives and burners). For the kid who likes books Cookbooks for—and sometimes by—kids cover a wide array of cuisines, themes, and skill levels. Two fun titles out this fall: America’s Test Kitchen’s The Complete Cookbook for Young Chefs and The Minecrafter’s Cookbook. For the kid who loves getting packages The just-launched Little Sous Kitchen Academy mails out a monthly “creative cooking box” that includes…

access_time3 min.
research roundup

The power of five Those healthy habits you’ve been cultivating may extend your life. Mining data from from population studies of approximately 79,000 women and 44,000 men, authors of a new study in Circulation estimate that people who 1) exercise regularly; 2) eat healthily; 3) do not smoke; 4) manage their weight; and 5) drink moderately (i.e., no more than one 5-ounce serving per day for women and two for men) may prolong their life expectancy at age 50 by an extra 14 years for women and 12 years for men compared with peers who practice none of the habits. Previous research had linked each of these five habits to longevity, but their combined impact—which researchers called “particularly powerful”—had never been analyzed. Food and your biological clock Two new unrelated studies highlight the…

access_time3 min.
ww woman to watch: sisterhood is powerful

Karen Jackson, 75, a three-time breast cancer survivor, is the founder and CEO of Sisters Network® Inc., a Houston-based nonprofit that connects African American women with breast cancer to local survivors and advocates. Here, Jackson talks about how she got her organization off the ground. “In 1993, I was a healthy, happy 50-year-old. Then, during my annual mammogram—I’d been getting them since I was 35—my doctor found a 3.5 centimeter mass of cancer cells. I had a lumpectomy followed by radiation and chemotherapy. “I had good insurance and lots of pluses—a husband, daughter, family, and friends who were supportive and understanding. Even so, I was devastated. I needed camaraderie, but when I looked for a group to join, I couldn’t find one. I was dismayed by the lack of resources for African…

access_time1 min.
treats aren’t tricky

WW: How do you make Halloween fun for the kids without letting them go overboard? ADRIENNE EVERAKES: I make the healthy snacks fun! I make faces out of fruits and vegetables. I’ve taken a watermelon and scooped it out and decorated it like a ghost by putting fruits on top of the hollow part to make a face and the body. WW: When your kids were young, how did you handle the flood of candy? AE: I would let them each keep ten pieces of candy. The rest we would donate to a nonprofit called For the Troops (forthetroops.org). We packed it all up and gave it to the group, which sends it to our deployed soldiers. The kids loved it, and my grandkids love it now—as do my Members! They even add…

access_time8 min.
new rules for better sleep

Your mother was probably the first to lay down the law to you about sleep, but now countless other authorities have echoed her words: “Go to bed!” In recent years, not getting enough sleep has been linked to mood and memory problems, weight issues, minor ailments like colds, serious health conditions such as heart disease and type 2 diabetes, and even a shorter lifespan. If you didn’t have insomnia before, just worrying about all these possibilities could keep you awake for hours. You’d be in good company—one third of the US population has trouble with sleep, from struggles dropping off to difficulty waking up on time. Fortunately, an increased medical focus on sleep is now creating research-based remedies to help you fall asleep, stay asleep, and wake up refreshed—and healthier. Get to…

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