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Yachting MonthlyYachting Monthly

Yachting Monthly May 2019

Published by Time Inc. (UK) Ltd Yachting monthly is at the heart of the British yachting market and is for people who actively sail their boats - whether cruising across the channel, around the coast or further a field in blue waters. It provides an entertaining mix of vital information for cruising yachtsmen with all levels of experience, which maximises their enjoyment, increases their skills and gives them the confidence to broaden their horizons.

Land:
United Kingdom
Taal:
English
Uitgever:
TI-Media
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13 Edities

IN DEZE EDITIE

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sunshine &fresh paint

Blessed relief! Spring is in the air, laced with the pleasant aroma of fresh antifoul. It’s time to get out and go sailing. Some sailors, however, have more get up and go than others. German sailor Susanne Huber-Curphey has just arrived in Tasmania having completed one and a half circumnavigations (p6). Her solo voyage from Maine covered 33,043 miles and followed in the wake of Bernard Moitessier as part of the Longue Route, a non-racing event that must count as the longest ever cruise in company, and quite some sailing feat. Three women have also just won top accolades for sailing in this country. Tracy Edwards is joint winner of the Yachtsman of the Year award, alongside Nikki Henderson (p7). Edwards was awarded the prize for her work restoring Maiden and establishing…

access_time3 min.
one-and-a-half times around the world

German solo skipper Susanne Huber-Curphey has made landfall in Tasmania, after circumnavigating non-stop around the world one-and-a-half times in her Koopmans 39, Nehaj during the Longue Route. Unlike the Golden Globe Race, the French-organised Longue Route isn’t a race. Instead it is a pilgrimage in tribute to Bernard Moitessier, who abandoned the 1968-69 Sunday Times Golden Globe Race to ‘save my soul’, and continued sailing his ketch Joshua until stopping in Tahiti 10 months after leaving Plymouth. Huber-Curphey, who is the first woman to navigate solo through the Northwest Passage, west to east, started the Longue Route from Portland, Maine on 14 June 2018. She arrived in Hobart 251 days later on 22 February 2019, having sailed 33,043 miles at an average speed of 5.5 knots. Speaking to Yachting Monthly, Huber-Curphey said from…

access_time1 min.
henderson and edwards jointly named yachtsman of the year

Nikki Henderson and Tracy Edwards have jointly won the Yachtsman of the Year Award 2018. At 24, Henderson became the youngest ever skipper to compete in the Clipper Round the World Race, coming second overall in the 2017-18 edition with her Visit Seattle team. She has just guest skippered Maiden during the yacht’s three-year global mission promoting girls’ education through The Maiden Factor. For Edwards, this is the second time she has won the Yachting Journalists’ Association (YJA) accolade. She first won it after skippering Maiden in the 1989-90 Whitbread Round the World Race. Edwards has received it a second time for her work on restoring Maiden and founding The Maiden Factor. The Young Sailor Award went to British Optimist champion Emily Mueller, 15. James Tomlinson, 19, won YJA’s Young Blogger of the…

access_time1 min.
news in numbers

70 A new 70-berth marina is planned for Scotland’s Stornoway Harbour, adjacent to Goat Island. Stornoway Port Authority has secured £3.5m funding from Highlands and Islands Enterprise for the project. 05 Five women have announced they will be competing in the 2020 Vendée Globe – a record for the race. They are Clarisse Crémer, Sam Davies, Isabelle Joschke, Alexia Barrier and Pip Hare. 07 Seven accolades have been presented at the RYA Annual Sailability Awards, with Bryony Limb, a sailor with the Nancy Oldfield Trust, named the Sailability Sailor of the Year.…

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south coast marine unit changes

The future of Hampshire’s marine unit has been secured, but two of its larger boats will be sold. The announcement by Hampshire Constabulary follows a year-long review into the unit’s operational effectiveness and its value for money. Current staffing levels will remain the same. The unit’s 12-metre catamaran and 11-metre patrol boat will be sold. Hampshire’s assistant chief constable, Scott Chilton said a third RIB would be added to its current fleet of two to improve ‘inland capabilities better able to carry out searches of rivers, lakes and mud to help us locate missing people and evidence from crimes.’ The unit will continue to support neighbourhood policing on the water. Meanwhile, Dorset Police has announced it is trebling the number of officers in its marine unit from three to nine, although they can be deployed…

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key yachting co-founder passes away

The Hamble-based brokerage, Key Yachting has announced its co-founder and managing director, Paul Heys has died while on holiday. In a statement, the firm said everyone was ‘desperately shocked and sad’ and Paul would be ‘missed terribly by everyone who knew him.’ ‘He was enjoying a much-deserved holiday in the Caribbean with his wife Marie-Claude and came into difficulties while swimming. ‘Paul was a much-loved husband, dad, brother and granddad, and was greatly admired in the sailing community; sailing was his life.’…

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