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Alberta Views MagazineAlberta Views Magazine

Alberta Views Magazine

November 2019

Alberta Views is the must-read magazine for those shaping the new Alberta. Well-educated, savvy citizens turn to the magazine when they want great writing and analysis.

Land:
Canada
Språk:
English
Utgiver:
Alberta Views Limited Partnership
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we get what we pay for

What if a nurse could bill a hospital for every IV drip she changed? Or if a police officer were given $100 for every arrest she made? Or if a city worker were paid for every pothole she filled? Our hospitals would buy a lot more IV bags. Our jails would be overcrowded. Our roads would be smoother than glass. It might seem odd to talk about compensating these public servants on a fee-for-service basis, but this is how we pay most doctors in Alberta’s healthcare system. Christina Frangou in “Bad Incentives” (p 24) explores the implications of relying on fees rather than alternative payment plans (APP) such as salaries or hourly wages. Among the upsides, she writes, fees “encourage doctors to see many patients.” But this can be a downside…

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contributors

Christina Frangou (“Bad Incentives,” p 24) is a health, medicine and social issues journalist. “Reducing the Harm,” her AV story about Lethbridge’s supervised drug consumption site, was a 2019 National Magazine Award finalist and won the 2019 Alberta Magazine Award for best long-form feature writing. Doug Horner (“Changing the Culture of Canadian Policing,” p 30) is a former departments editor at Alberta Views and winner of the 2019 Alberta Magazine Award for best essay. A previous AV article was about how new ideas in neuroscience are transforming a Blood Reserve school (Sep 2018). Niki Wilson (“Boar War,” p 36), a writer and documentarian, grew up dodging bears in Jasper National Park, and as a biologist studied everything from mammoths to mountain pine beetles. Her writing can be found at BBC Earth, PBS…

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letters

I JUST GOT THE OCTOBER ISSUE in the mail. I feel sorry for those letter writers who so lack a sense of humour as to be offended by September’s “Now Alberta’s Great Again” cover. It was clearly meant to be tongue-in-cheek, not serious. I, for one, thought it was hilarious and bang on. JERRY MACDONALD, Grande Prairie THE OCTOBER DIALOGUE “Is an individual responsible for his own poverty?” was enlightening, especially in the context of that issue. People like Chris Sarlo appear to have a rather narrow view of issues such as poverty. They believe good things happen if people are less restricted in what they’re allowed to do. They don’t want actions governed in ways that fix obvious failings of that free-for-all. They think the system is infallible or fixes itself. This…

access_time6 min.
the scene

THEATRE EDMONTON Baroness Bianka’s Bloodsongs By Joanna Weinberg, Northern Light Theatre, Studio Theatre, ATB Arts Barns, Oct 18–Nov 2 The Roommate By Jen Silverman, Shadow Theatre, Varscona Theatre, Oct 23–Nov 10 The Ballad of Peachtree Rose By Nicole Moeller, Workshop West, Backstage Theatre, ATB Arts Barns, Oct 30–Nov 10 Six By Toby Marlow and Lucy Moss, Citadel Theatre, Shoctor Theatre, Nov 2–24 Three Ladies By Lady Vanessa Cardona, Hip Hop in the Park and Punctuate! Theatre, Studio Theatre, ATB Arts Barns, Nov 7–16 Bed and Breakfast By Mark Crawford, Theatre Network, Roxy on Gateway, Nov 19–Dec 8 Pippin Score by Stephen Schwartz, MacEwan Theatre, Allard Hall, Triffo Theatre, Nov 20–30 The Skin of Our Teeth By Thornton Wilder, Varscona Theatre Ensemble, Varscona Theatre, Nov 21–Dec 1 Mr. Burns, A Post-Electric Play By Anna Washburn, You Are Here Theatre/Blarney Productions, Westbury Theatre, Nov 26–Dec 8 Revolt. She Said. Revolt Again. By Alice…

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remembrance of medicine past

There is a vast deal of difference in the [medical] practice of now and that of four decades ago. Then, the doctor had to be a versatile genius. He had to bleed, to cut off legs, to perform other surgical operations, and to treat fevers, rheumatism and diseases of all sorts. If he lived in the county he was apt to be called out of bed at night to ride through the rain about 20 miles over bottomless roads. In this event he gathered up his saddlebags, buttoned on leggings that reached to his hips and set out through the dark. Perhaps he got his fee, and perhaps he did not. Money was scarce and hard to get, and people in those days thought, as many think now, that the…

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future painkiller

Virtual reality is being used to help patients undergoing wound care at Rockyview General Hospital to help ease pain and anxiety during treatment—a first of its kind in Canada. Two Samsung Gear virtual reality headsets were anonymously donated to the hospital after the donor saw research on the benefits of virtual reality during treatment. Patients who use it are transported to an immersive, three-dimensional environment such as a lakeside campground, a prehistoric landscape with dinosaurs or a tranquil ocean to swim with dolphins. “As soon as you put it on the patient and they enter the environment they’ve chosen, you can almost see an immediate effect in their body language and their breathing,” said Jaclyn Frank, wound care physiotherapist at Rockyview. “Their whole body relaxes, their breathing slows down and you…

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