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Dumbo FeatherDumbo Feather

Dumbo Feather Issue 53

Dumbo Feather is an iconic Australian magazine. Published quarterly for seven years, and hailed around the world as a design leader, it is a magazine like no other. Our readers are people who want to be told a different story than the one they hear every day. Each quarterly issue features five extended (20 page) profiles of people worth knowing, across enterprise, education, science, sport, politics, fashion and the arts. Whether they’ve touched millions, or just those around them, we take the time to get to know these people, and ask them to tell us their stories.

Land:
Australia
Språk:
English
Utgiver:
Dumbo Feather Pty Ltd
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KJØP UTGAVE
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4 Utgaver

I DENNE UTGAVEN

access_time3 min.
featured photography

Dear Reader, The idea of power has never sat well with me. In my mind, it’s been equated with many of the atrocities our world has seen: slavery, war, deforestation, oil spills. It’s been about having control in a relationship, limiting the freedom of another person or group, speaking loudly with absolute conviction. Power, for me, has been the ugly side of human nature, completely self-serving and pandering to the ego. Whenever I sense this kind of dynamic at play, I recoil and go inward, unable to bring my most useful self to a situation. Over the past year, however, as my work at Dumbo Feather has deepened, I’ve found myself using the word “power” in a different way. I’ll say it when I see someone creating opportunities for others, or asking…

access_time6 min.
power and the feminine

I’m so glad no one asked me to write about women in power 20 years ago. It was 1997. I was smashing it in 1997. First year of a highly competitive university degree, winning all the things. Writing about women in power then would have produced a piece that was part invitation to join the celebration of the triumph of equality, and part subtle scold of women who, like the lecturer in my introductory feminism class, appeared stuck in the adorably irrelevant ’70s. Everything she described seemed so out of touch with my (lack of) experience that I dismissed it the way you do when an aging relative tells you they’re off to the post office to pay their “electric” because you can’t trust The Internet. If I wrote this piece…

access_time8 min.
woman in the mirror

It is 2006, and I have just become a mother. I am enveloped by the primal power of childbirth, of doing what no man can ever do. After a difficult 17-hour labour and birth, I ask my husband Warren what it was like for him. He says he felt like a spectator. Helpless. I, in turn, felt like a warrior. Every moment of the pain had purpose. I took the deepest cuts and survived. Like billions of other women through time, I possess life-giving Power with a capital P. And yet the narrative around motherhood does not fully acknowledge this. I wonder why women don’t organise to mandate universal childcare, but I don’t have time to go deeper into this question because my baby is in serious trouble. He has seizures…

access_time10 min.
rose marcario is leading the change

Since its founding in 1973, Patagonia has been a pioneer in treating its employees well, caring for the environment and making a profit while doing good. While it is most well-known for its rugged outdoor clothes, these days Patagonia’s family of ventures includes a food company, a $42 million venture fund, a small media company and more—all tied to the common goal of using business to inspire and implement environmental solutions. In 2014, Rose Marcario took over as the CEO of Patagonia Works, the umbrella organisation for all these initiatives, and has continued to expand the brand’s global impact. In this special B Corp feature, we share an interview with Rose from our friends at Conscious Company Media. CONSCIOUS COMPANY: What’s the story of how you got to where you are…

access_time12 min.
ronni kahn rescues food

SUBJECT Ronni Kahn INTERVIEWER Nathan Scolaro LOCATION Sydney, Australia ANTIDOTE TO Food waste and hunger OCCUPATION Social entrepreneur PHOTOGRAPHER Toby Burrows DATE August 2017 UNEXPECTED Used to overcater “Almost every day I come face to face with acts of generosity, and see how people are moved and touched by the fact that when they start being generous with their time, with their spirit, with their money, with their gifts, they are infinitely rewarded.” Ronni Kahn was working at a private function one evening—over-catering as was the way of her popular events company—when something clicked. This bounty of leftover lamb shanks and beef bourguignon could have a much brighter destiny than the evening trash. As the guests sipped the last of their champagne, Ronni covertly transferred the food into containers and stowed it in the back of her car. The…

access_time23 min.
volunteering at the ozharvest market

I volunteer every Monday at the OzHarvest Market in Kensington, Sydney, and take the customers one by one to fill their basket with goodies—including freshly baked bread from the Bread and Butter Project, which helps teach asylum seekers and refugees how to bake. From 10am to 2pm, people from all walks of life enter our doors, and everyone leaves with a lovely bag of fresh food and sense of fulfilment at being able to provide for their loved ones that night. Working with like-minded volunteers, distributing food to approximately 120 people a day, creates a great sense of purpose. We are preventing the food from going to landfill, and at the same time we are providing to the very needy who cannot afford to put good food on the table for…

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