menu
close
search
UTFORSKBIBLIOTEK
searchclose
shopping_cart_outlined
exit_to_app
category_outlined / Livsstil for menn
EsquireEsquire

Esquire August 2017

Esquire is a funny, informative, connected magazine that covers the interests of American men—all the interests of the American man: Politics, style, advice, women, health, eating and drinking, the most interesting people of our time. All that and it’s the most-honored monthly magazine in history.

Land:
United States
Språk:
English
Utgiver:
Hearst
Les merkeyboard_arrow_down
SPESIAL: Save 50% on your subscription!
KJØP UTGAVE
NOK60.47
ABONNER
NOK172.92NOK86.46
9 Utgaver

I DENNE UTGAVEN

access_time1 min.
from the archives: inspiration board esky floats into summer, 1952

Our August issue was packed with summer reads, including “Steinberg: The Scalpel—The Sharp Line of Many Points,” a photo portfolio on the artist Saul Steinberg. The original short story “Pay-off Girl,” by master of noir fiction James M. Cain (The Postman Always Rings Twice, Double Indemnity), includes the hard-boiled lines “She spoke low, but meant business. He tossed some cubes in a glass and made her iced coffee, and she took the next stool to drink it.” Hot stuff. No wonder Esky had to take to his dinghy to chill. To read the rest of Cain’s mini-masterpiece and more stories by America’s greatest writers over Esquire’s eightyfour years—plus have access to every issue we’ve ever published— check out classic.esquire.com.…

access_time3 min.
the sweet spot

Ah, the lazy joys of summer . . . (photograph: Alexei Hay)August is a bit of a sore subject for me. In principle, it’s one of the great months, second perhaps only to December in its promise of extended days off and indulgent pleasures. The older you get, the more you realize these months hold modern man’s universal blocks of R & R. In between, we all slave away, working to win the reward of toobrief a time off.My boyhood memories of late summer aren’t great. Some are specific, like the birthday I broke my toe or the one when the bakery accidentally delivered only half a chocolate cake. Then there was the free-floating anxiety of having to go back to jail, i.e., school. Even now, when August rolls around,…

access_time1 min.
contributors

Victor DemarchelierPhotographer of “Elba’s Ease,” page 50Credentials: His work has appeared in Town & Country, Harper’s Bazaar, and more. On shooting Idris Elba: “Idris was great, very easygoing, handsome, intelligent, and smart to work with.” This summer you’ll find him: Likely in the South of France with his wife. Best advice: “Do what you love to do and you will be successful in life.”George PendleAuthor of “The Masochist’s Marathon,” page 90Credentials: His work has appeared in The Guardian, Cabinet, and others; author of three books. This summer you’ll find him: In Rensselaerville, New York. Which feels: “Plucked out of the pages of Tom Sawyer.” Worst date: “Being invited back to a girl’s place for a cup of coffee. And then being given a cup of coffee.”Emily PoenischEsquire’s Entertainment Features DirectorOn…

access_time3 min.
master of strange

Seven years ago, Bong Joon ho, one of South Korea’s most celebrated directors, was driving through the streets of Seoul when an idea reared up in his mind: It was an animal, four stories high, an introverted beast whose size belies its air of vulnerability. That creature would become the basis of Bong’s latest film, the Netflix feature Okja, a dizzying sci-fi satire with a tone and tenor reminiscent of his 2013 movie Snowpiercer. Starring Tilda Swinton, Jake Gyllenhaal, Paul Dano, and Steven Yeun, Okja tells the tale of the Super Pig, a gargantuan swine engineered by an agrochemical giant to feed a greedy world that’s gobbling its way through the food supply. The pigs are raised in arable bliss by doting artisanal farmers (a marketing narrative orchestrated to sell…

access_time1 min.
meet hans zimmer, edm hero

(illustration: Stéphane Manel)This past spring, thousands of millennials in flower crowns and artfully ripped denim gathered in the California desert to hail Coachella’s unlikeliest hero: a 59-year-old in baggy pants and a wrinkled polo.Composer Hans Zimmer strapped on his guitar (rather than grabbing a baton and a tux) and stunned the crowd with a 66-person band that played selections from his many classic scores, from films such as Inception and The Lion King. It was his friends Pharrell Williams and Johnny Marr who urged him to “stop hiding behind the screen.” Zimmer was awed by the live experience. “It’s not just you and the musicians on the stage, it’s the audience that completes the music.” Now he’s taking the surprisingly psychedelic show on a 45-date tour.He’s also enjoyed viral videos…

access_time1 min.
watch the battle of the summer

It begins in an elevator and ends in a river. One of the year’s greatest fight scenes happens about two thirds into Atomic Blonde, a thrumming spy thriller set in the days before the fall of the Berlin Wall. Agent Lorraine Broughton, played by Charlize Theron, gets tossed down stairs in ways that would put dollar signs in a chiropractor’s eyes. At one point, she uses a hot plate and a corkscrew as weapons. She appears close to death throughout what looks to be one long take. If it seems uncannily visceral, that’s because it is—the choreography was so intense that a trained stuntman had to work the camera. You may feel like you need an ice pack after watching the thing. For director David Leitch, a former stuntman himself…

help