UTFORSKBIBLIOTEK
searchclose
shopping_cart_outlined
exit_to_app
category_outlined / Livsstil for menn
EsquireEsquire

Esquire March 2015

Esquire is a funny, informative, connected magazine that covers the interests of American men—all the interests of the American man: Politics, style, advice, women, health, eating and drinking, the most interesting people of our time. All that and it’s the most-honored monthly magazine in history.

Land:
United States
Språk:
English
Utgiver:
Hearst
Les merkeyboard_arrow_down
KJØP UTGAVE
NOK63.51
ABONNER
NOK181.64
9 Utgaver

I DENNE UTGAVEN

access_time4 min.
the cold open

I’ve watched the kid across the street grow up and, since he learned to drive, observed the succession of pickup trucks parked by the curb in front of his house, the little driveway and garage reserved for his parents. I noticed, as well, that about the time of the first white pickup (later wrecked, replaced with a black one--they have all been black or white) he learned to spit. What’s that about? The spitting thing. I sense the spitting thing and the pickup thing may not be unrelated. May, in fact, together--especially here, in the almost clinical clarity of this paved and curbed and rectilinear 1950s neighborhood, so far from the confusion any pickup-worthy farm or ranch activity might introduce--present some seminal expression of the masculine relation to the world.…

access_time2 min.
the ombudswoman

“The State of the Celebrity Chef ” Gordon Ramsay teaches cooking classes to children and inmates, for God’s sake. How much of a monster can he be? I worry this generation doesn’t appreciate a good yelling. As my Soul Cycle instructors advise me, “It’s not supposed to be easy.” They also urge me to “get comfortable with getting uncomfortable.” And they suggest, “Please wipe down your bike seat when you are finished.” This is my long-winded way of saying I’m Team Ramsay. “The Jersey Bird” There is nothing I love more than a dish that takes you straight back to your childhood. The childhood dish that takes me straight back home is delicious tuna casserole. Spaghetti, cream of mushroom soup, and tuna from the can. Throw in peas for color and you can…

access_time3 min.
frequently asked questions for the editor

A NOTE FROM THE EDITOR I noticed that the magazine looked a little different last month. What’s that about? We constantly redesign the magazine, especially the front sections. I’ve always thought that if I’m getting bored with the way it looks, then the people who read it will, too, sooner rather than later. So we changed a bunch of stuff: Like we begin the entire magazine with a piece of writing, called The Cold Open. (See page 31.) Usually it will be tangentially related to something you will come across later. (In this case, it’s a funny beautiful essay on trucks, which to my mind are in the middle of a new golden age.) And Man at His Best is a little more freewheeling. We decided to stop filling holes, which is what…

access_time5 min.
the profile

Man at His Best Before she summons me to a restaurant on the outskirts of Brooklyn on the first snowy, sleety day of the new year—and before she was an actor, a producer, a social activist, a fire-breathing liberal, and (drumroll, please) a one-time list-topper of the Maxim Hot 100—Olivia Wilde was a precocious, dramatic child bouncing around her parents’ Georgetown townhouse and prone, like many precocious, dramatic children, to being a pain in the ass. Her parents were (and are) celebrated, deeply serious investigative journalists by the name of Cockburn (pronounced the Co-burn way, not the phonetic way) who treated her more or less as an adult from the get-go. “And whenever I was being kind of a pill, whining or whatever,” she says, “my parents would say, ‘Oh, Olivia,…

access_time5 min.
the 16th annual alternative oscars

MOST INSCRUTABLE MOVIE TITLE TO THE ALIENS WHO EVENTUALLY WILL FIND US The Hunger Games— Mockingjay, Part 1 SEX VIBE OF THE YEAR: WEIR D, SUP PR ESS ED HOMOEROTICISM 300: Rise of an Empire The Interview Foxcatcher BEST PERFORMANCE BY A FORMER SNL CAST MEMBER IN THE SKELETON TWINS Bill Hader, playing a suicidal gay man. SENTENCE OF THE YEAR “The bulk beings are closing the tesseract.” -Interstellar WORST PERFORMANCE BY A FORMER SNL CAST MEMBER IN THE SKELETON TWINS Kristen Wiig, failing to play a regular human. THE POETRY OF THE MOVIES NO ONE EVER SAW White Bird in a Blizzard Blue Ruin The Good Lie As Above, So Below Hector and the Search for Happiness Why Don’t You Play in Hell? BIGGEST MARTYR (DIVINE) Jesus in Son of God. BIGGEST MARTYR (MORTAL) The Interview BEST PERFORMANCE BY AL PACINO Oscar Isaac, playing a Michael Corleone-esque man trying to build…

access_time1 min.
best excuse for cutting the ticket line: interstellar

Christopher Nolan has reached that stage of his career when his name has become affixed to certain adjectives: He is forever ambitious (or overreaching) and audacious (or egomania-cal), which means he has also become the sort of director that moviegoers now use to define themselves. You are with him or against him, and Interstellar made us finally choose sides. That beautiful, flawed epic-in which Matthew McCo-naughey was somehow lifted off his farm to pilot a 1,000-year space mission-was like a test for entry into a cult. Nolan demanded that you just go with him and in exchange you would receive something like Interstellar’s launch sequence, the most moving two minutes of cinema this year that didn’t involve a boy growing up. And then Nolan used his influence to make another romantic…

help