Guitarist

November 2021

Guitarist is the longest established UK guitar magazine. You'll find authoritative gear reviews, artist interviews, technique lessons and advice. Plus, Guitarist's digital edition now includes all of the same audio and video content as the print edition; available to download from a special area of the Guitarist website!

Land:
United Kingdom
Språk:
English
Utgiver:
Future Publishing Ltd
Hyppighet:
Monthly
kr 43,45
kr 348,24
13 Utgaver

i denne utgaven

1 min
lost music

Our cover feature this month deals with a question that all of us have pondered at one time or another: what happens to the guitars that pass out of our lives, either sold, stolen or misplaced? The fate of instruments used by iconic players such as Jimi Hendrix is of special interest (see feature, page 62), but every player can lay claim to at least one story of guitars lost and regretted ever after. Some, including Whitesnake veteran Bernie Marsden, have suggested that guitars should come with a logbook like a car – providing a record of who has owned them. But perhaps it’s better that mystery accompanies guitars that come into our lives without provenance. Like a stray cat that climbs in through the window one day and makes…

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9 min
putting on the style

Regular Guitarist readers will be aware of York-based guitar maker Leigh Dovey and his PJD team. If you caught our last issue, you’ll also know he’s busy preparing production of a new Cream T guitar co-designed with none other than Billy F Gibbons and, without letting any cats out of the bag, there are more collaborations in the pipeline. In the past 12 months since we last reviewed a PJD, the company has taken on more staff – which now number 12 – and is producing nearly 40 instruments per month. It all seems a long time away from playing an early PJD Woodford, nearly four years ago, which we featured in issue 438. Promise isn’t always fulfilled, but in this case it most definitely has been. Aside from that original…

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1 min
under the hood

The inside of the Woodford is extremely neat and tidy. The scratchplate is backed with copper foil, pots are CTS 280kohms, there’s a quality USA CRL five-way lever switch and the Orange Drop cap value is .022 microfarads (223F). All the wiring is cloth-covered and long leads are tidied with plastic cable ties. The wiring is like the original Strat (albeit it hum-cancelling in mix positions) with tones for neck and middle, not bridge – but it’s simple to alter that. The body is routed for HSS if you prefer that setup. The St John’s rear-mounted controls sit in a pretty cramped cavity, again copper-foil screened including the wooden cavity cover. It’s the same quality components, wired modern-style, including the same value capacitor, but here the pot values are 500k and…

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1 min
pjd woodford standard

PRICE: £1,250 ORIGIN: UK TYPE: Double-cutaway, solidbody hardtail electric BODY: 2-piece American ash NECK: Quarter-sawn roasted figured maple, standard C profile, bolt-on SCALE LENGTH: 648mm (25.5”) NUT/WIDTH: Bone/42.7mm FINGERBOARD: Roasted maple, rectangular black acrylic inlays, compound 254-305mm (10-12”) radius FRETS: 22, medium (Jescar FW55090) HARDWARE: Gotoh SB-5115-001 Strat-style hardtail bridge with block steel saddles and through-body stringing, Gotoh SD-91 vintage-style split-post tuners – nickel-plated STRING SPACING, BRIDGE: 53mm ELECTRICS: Bare Knuckle Boot Camp Old Guard single coils, 5-way toggle pickup selector switch, master volume and tone controls WEIGHT (kg/lb): 3.57/7.85 OPTIONS: PJD Hiscox hard case costs £160. HSS option. Scratchplate colour RANGE OPTIONS: PJD’s core guitar is the Carey in Standard (£1,899), Elite (from £2,399), Ltd Ed (from £2,699) and Custom (from £3,299) styles LEFT-HANDERS: To order, same price FINISHES: Peacock Blue from 11-colour choice – thin satin nitrocellulose to both body and neck PJD Guitars 01904…

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1 min
pjd st john standard

PRICE: £1,899 (inc case) ORIGIN: UK TYPE: Double-cutaway, offset chambered body hardtail electric BODY: 2-piece American ash (chambered) NECK: Quarter-sawn roasted figured maple, standard C profile, bolt-on SCALE LENGTH: 648mm (25.5”) NUT/WIDTH: Bone/42.7mm FINGERBOARD: Roasted maple, rectangular black acrylic inlays, compound 254-305mm (10-12”) radius FRETS: 22, medium (Jescar FW55090) HARDWARE: Gotoh SB-5115-001 Strat-style hardtail bridge with block steel saddles and through-body stringing, Gotoh SD-91 vintage-style split-post tuners – nickel-plated STRING SPACING, BRIDGE: 53mm ELECTRICS: Cream T Eliminator humbucker (bridge) and P-90 soapbar single coil (neck), 3-way toggle pickup selector switch, master volume and tone controls WEIGHT (kg/lb): 3.18/7 OPTIONS: F-hole, Bare Knuckle Boot Camp Old Guard humbucker/P-90. Choice of pickguard and pickup mounting ring colours RANGE OPTIONS: St John Elite (£2,399) adds figured (quilt/flame) maple top with a range of top colours over natural back and sides. St John Ltd (£2,699) adds chambered mahogany…

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6 min
need for tweed

The tweed-covered guitar combo is one of music’s most enduring product formats, dating right back to the original amps made by Fender in the mid-1950s. Other features of those groundbreaking early Fenders included a pine cabinet with hand-wired eyelet board electronics inside a chromed steel chassis, Jensen Alnico loudspeakers, white lettering, and chickenhead knobs that went all the way to 12 (which Spinal Tap fans know is one more than 11 and two more than 10!). Ever since, the looks, if not the electronics, have been repeatedly plundered by manufacturers looking to impart some vintage mojo to their designs, not least Fender itself, who mashed several different styles together including tweed for its 1990s Blues amps, which preceded the popular Hot Rod series. Other notable tweed entries over the years include…

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