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House and LeisureHouse and Leisure

House and Leisure August 2018

House and Leisure – For those who want to celebrate all aspects of contemporary, stylish living in South Africa. House and Leisure is more than just a décor magazine. It’s the local premium brand with authority on Stylish SA at Home and Play. A source of warmth and pride, loved for celebrating the positives of life in South Africa, it’s the only decor home magazine that also offers strong leisure and lifestyle editorial content. Please note: this digital version of the magazine does not include the covermount items you would find on printed newsstand copies.

Land:
South Africa
Språk:
English
Utgiver:
Associated Magazines (Pty) Ltd
Les merkeyboard_arrow_down
KJØP UTGAVE
NOK23.37
ABONNER
NOK107.88
6 Utgaver

I DENNE UTGAVEN

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editor’s letter

Working in magazines these days is like being on a really wild roller-coaster ride. House and Leisure is no different, but the beauty of working on such a ground-breaking brand is that you are supported by equally wild thinkers and risk takers. It’s not often that you are challenged by your CEO and management team to think more creatively, to be more out-of-the-box and to push the boundaries of a traditional print product by developing strategic yet complementary channels around the brand. The world of House and Leisure became even more exciting almost a year ago when Associated Media Publishing’s head of digital, Elrike Lochner, joined the team with a very clear and direct digital strategy. Coupled with CEO Julia Raphaely’s drive to connect you, the reader, with all the great…

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houseandleisure.co.za

1 EXCLUSIVE: READ OUR INTERVIEW WITH THE DOYENNE OF AMERICAN INTERIORS, KELLY WEARSTLER. HER CLIENT LIST INCLUDES GWEN STEFANI AND CAMERON DIAZ. AT 50, SHE SHOWS NO SIGN OF SLOWING DOWN, AS SHE CONTINUES TO CREATE MODERN SPACES FOR LUXURY HOTEL GROUPS AND PRIVATE CLIENTS. 2 WIN: 1 OF 3 COPIES OF JUST ADD RICE Taiwanese-South African Ming-Cheau Lin’s new recipe book, Just Add Rice (R375, Quivertree Publications) with photography by Craig Fraser, is an ode to Taiwanese food, but more than that also celebrates the culture and recipes that connected her to her parents when they lived in a distant country. Read our review of Just Add Rice and stand the chance to win one of three copies. 3 HEAD TO HARRINGTON STREET Watch our video and virtually walk the streets…

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contributors

EMMA FOLLETT-BOTHA Emma, HL’s chief copy editor, considers herself a stickler for good grammar and a lover of design, food and film. She has an insatiable need to learn more about the cultures and traditions of the world. Who are the top SA creatives on your radar? Faatimah and Al Luke, Kayla Schoonraad, Saara Jappie-Adams and Buhle Ngaba. If money were no object, what would you buy? A Tuscan villa. What’s on your list of winter decor essentials? Chunky, graphic throws, mood lighting and scented candles. Bold brights and graphic prints – yay or nay? Yes to both! What three words best describe your home? Bohemian, cluttered and inviting. What’s always in your fridge? Milk, spinach and double cream yoghurt. The next place you’d like to visit is… Istanbul. GARRETH VAN NIEKERK HL’s senior…

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shop: our wood and texture collection

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mix & match

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new is not so new

There are two things I’ve always dreaded about getting older. The first is reminiscing about the good old days. This can take many forms, from sitting with dear friends and talking about all the madness you got up to back then, to being stuck listening only to music from your early adulthood. I fear the latter so much that I flatly refuse to go to concerts headlined by the artists I loved in my late teens and early twenties. The second thing I dread is finding myself judging youth and new cultural trends. A perfect example of this is when you begin your sentences with phrases like: ‘In my day…’ or ‘These kids of today…’ Every generation seems to forget how much of a departure they were from the one before…

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