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UTFORSKBIBLIOTEK
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LIFE The Most Haunted Places

LIFE The Most Haunted Places

LIFE The Most Haunted Places

You might want to keep the lights on as you read The World’s Most Haunted Places. This spine-chilling Special Edition from LIFE is filled with striking photos and eerie stories about some of the world’s creepiest places. There’s the hotel that inspired The Shining . . . the Amityville Horror house . . . and the dilapidated farm that was home to the serial killer who inspired The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, The Silence of the Lambs, and Psycho. Not every spot is horrifying, though. Some, like Angkor Wat or the ancient ruins under Lake Titicaca—are mysterious, even spiritual. Others, filled with mummies, abandoned dolls, rusting prison bars, or headstones, are unnerving. But they all have one thing in common—they exist partly in our world, and partly in a shadowy realm of fear and horror. With dozens of unforgettable photographs The World’s Most Haunted Places takes readers on a round-the-world tour of places that you’ll never be able to forget.

Land:
United States
Språk:
English
Utgiver:
Meredith Corporation
Les mer
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I DENNE UTGAVEN

1 min.
introduction

“THERE IS NO END to the old houses, with resounding galleries, and dismal state-bedchambers, and haunted wings shut up for many years, through which we may ramble . . . and encounter any number of ghosts,” Charles Dickens once wrote. The great English writer might as well have added Polish caves, Babylonian ruins, and Mexican mummy museums to his list of ghostly places—as we here at LIFE have done, bringing you a book filled with blood-curdling photos and eerie stories about the world’s creepiest spots. Think the hotel that inspired The Shining, the Amityville Horror house, and the dilapidated farm that was home-sweet-home to the serial killer who inspired The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, The Silence of the Lambs, and Psycho. No, not all these spots are strictly haunted. Some—like Australia’s Uluru (a.k.a.…

2 min.
the paranormal prison alcatraz

ON MAY 2, 1946, in what became known as the Battle of Alcatraz, six prisoners overpowered guards, stole their weapons, and tried to escape from the prison on this isolated island in San Francisco Bay. But when they realized they were missing the key they needed to flee into the recreation yard, they grew desperate, took captives, and started shooting. Over the next 48 hours, two prison officers were killed and 18 injured. Three would-be escapees were shot to death in the utility corridor between cell blocks—the very spot that, 36 years later, San Francisco radio anchor Ted Wygant was exploring with a psychic when he was overcome by a feeling of violence and evil. “I got this tremendous feeling of anger,” he told the Travel Channel. “I felt this presence…

4 min.
the psycho house ed gein’s farm

SOMEWHERE in the Plainfield, Wisconsin, cemetery lies an unmarked grave belonging to the man who—thanks to his Hollywood influence—may be America’s most infamous serial killer. In the same burial ground lies what remains of the women he dug up in the 1950s—and turned into a perverse variety of handicrafts. Not surprisingly, the place is said to be haunted by the restless soul of one of the fiend’s victims—unnamed in death as in life—prowling the lonely graves. In November 1957, Plainfield was shaken to its core after 58-year-old Bernice Worden, owner of the local hardware store, disappeared. Her son told the local sheriff that he’d found blood in the store—and that a 51-year-old local handyman named Ed Gein had recently come in looking for antifreeze. Tracing Gein down to the ramshackle, isolated farmhouse…

3 min.
where rosemary’s baby was born the dakota

WHEN JOHN LENNON and Yoko Ono moved into the Dakota on 72nd Street and Central Park West in 1973, they were well aware the building was rumored to be haunted. So they hired a medium to conduct a séance in their seventh-floor apartment—and reached Jessie Ryan, the recently departed wife of Dirty Dozen actor Robert Ryan, who’d sold them the unit. No blithe spirit, Jessie promptly announced that she intended to stay in the couple’s digs, which did not make the Ryans’ daughter Lisa happy. “If my mother’s ghost belongs anywhere,” she told Ono, “it’s here with me.” Most of the Dakota’s spirits don’t belong here, of course, but they seem to have been in residence since the building was completed in 1884. Built for Singer Sewing Machine president Edward S. Clark…

1 min.
the edgar allan poe house baltimore

IN THE EARLY MORNING hours of September 27, 1849, Edgar Allan Poe left Richmond, Virginia, on a steamer heading to Baltimore. He wasn’t seen again until nearly a week later, when he was found—delirious, probably drunk, and wearing someone else’s clothes—in a Baltimore tavern. Hospitalized, the great writer raved, repeatedly shouting someone’s name—until, on October 7, he muttered “Lord help my poor soul,” and died. Now a museum, the Edgar Allan Poe House on Baltimore’s Amity Street is where the writer lived in the early 1830s. It is, locals say, haunted—but not by Poe’s “poor soul.” Some have seen the spirit of a stout old woman dressed in clothing of the early 1800s. Others have reported visitations of a specter known as “Mr. Eddie.” Doors and windows open and shut when…

2 min.
the winchester mystery house san jose, california

“THERE IS SOMETHING of the awful ‘House of Usher’ about it,” one journalist wrote of the Winchester Mystery House after it first opened to the public in San Jose, California, in 1923. “I, for one, would tremendously like to give a Hallowe’en party in this old home.” The rumors about the mazelike Victorian mansion started soon after its eccentric owner, Sarah Winchester, began her elaborately idiosyncratic construction. And they continue to this day, fueled in part by the guides who lead tourists through the bizarre structure’s odd nooks and crannies, past doors that open into walls, and up staircases that go nowhere. There are now 160 rooms, 2,000 doors, 10,000 windows, 47 stairways, 47 fireplaces, 13 bathrooms, and six kitchens. (Tourists are warned against wandering off—they could be lost for hours.) This…