Linux Format April 2021

Linux Format is your complete guide to the world of Linux. Whether you've just discovered Linux, or you're a full-time guru, Linux Format has everything you need to make the most of your OS. The editorial formula is a mix of features, reviews and practical tutorials that tackle topics as far ranging as installing software to socket programming and network management. Thought-provoking features and interviews also provide a focus on key technologies, trends and issues in the fast-paced world of Free and Open Source software.

Land:
United Kingdom
Språk:
English
Utgiver:
Future Publishing Ltd
Hyppighet:
Monthly
SPESIAL: Get 40% OFF with code: READ40
kr 59
kr 548,57
13 Utgaver

i denne utgaven

1 min
who we are

Jonni Bidwell Grafana is fancy and all, but I’m pleased that my Pi generates graphs from CSV files with Gnuplot, then displays them on a TFT screen. It’s amazing how even though you’re only dealing with 240 pixels, hours can be spent tweaking the axes and layout to make them look just right. Nick Peers I’ve just built an Ubuntu-powered server for media-streaming duties. I want to run it headless, so have installed the brilliant Cockpit ( sudo apt install cockpit -y ) to monitor it via my browser. I can keep it up to date, access a Terminal and run Docker containers easily, too. Les Pounder Because I own a rather elderly desktop machine, I need to keep an eye on my resources and so I used bashtop to keep an eye on my…

linuxforuk2104_article_003_01_03
2 min
puny humans!

I’d always say the biggest security threat to any system is the human using it. That’s not because said human is malicious or incompetent – people make mistakes, after all. But that’s compounded when you’re effectively tricked into making mistakes by phishing attacks or malware. A lot of phishing is carried out to compromise online accounts and Linux is lucky that most malware still targets Windows. But equally those puny human design systems that are flawed, and not always in obvious ways. Two-factor authentication is an awesome tool and it can make you feel super secure… even when the system is flawed. After all, when you can just select a “forgot your password” link and have everything reset, then any extra security goes out the window. Security isn’t a feature, it’s a…

linuxforuk2104_article_003_02_01
2 min
libreoffice community edition and ng project

LibreOffice, the free and open source office software suite, has had a busy start to 2021, which shows the project is as ambitious as ever. The team delivered LibreOffice 7.1 Community (download it from http://bit.ly/LXF274LibreOffice7) that features several big changes for Writer, Calc, Impress and Draw. The ability to tweak the interface when you first load it up, and an updated extension manager are also included, as is initial support for running LibreOffice 7.1 native on ARM64. However, perhaps the biggest change is that this is the first release labelled ‘Community’. While this hasn’t had any major impact on the scope of LibreOffice, it highlights the fact that this release is for the community of personal users who have supported LibreOffice over the years, rather than businesses. The Document Foundation (TDF), the…

linuxforuk2104_article_006_01_01
2 min
centos fallout continues

Last issue we reported on Red Hat’s decision to discontinue CentOS 8, its popular distro for enthusiasts and small businesses, and the fallout from that decision is still rumbling on. Originally meant to be supported until 2029, Red Hat’s announcement that it was being discontinued early meant that many users who were expecting the full 10 years of long-term support were suddenly left feeling abandoned. The fact that Red Hat claimed that CentOS Stream was designed to replace CentOS didn’t help matters – mainly because Red Hat has been vague about the actual role of the new distro. However, as ArsTechnica reports (http://bit.ly/LXF274ArsCent), Red Hat has tried to clarify, by stating that, “We’re making CentOS Stream the collaboration hub for RHEL,” and that Fedora will be “the place for major new…

linuxforuk2104_article_007_01_01
1 min
rocky linux gets a surprise backer

Red Hat’s decision to kill off CentOS is still having repercussions in the industry. Rocky Linux, an alternative to CentOS created by CentOS co-founder Gregory Kurtzer and announced as soon as Red Hat’s plans became known, has just received a major boost, with a new startup company, Ctrl IQ (https://ctrliq.com) announcing that it’ll be sponsoring the distro. Interestingly, Ctrl IQ was founded by Gregory Kurtzer. The company, which will offer a ‘fully supported technology stack’ to help enterprises improve their workflows across multiple sites or cloud services, will use some of its income to help develop Rocky Linux – which is still in very early days. Rocky Linux looks like it’ll form part of Ctrl IQ’s services. However, a Ctrl IQ representative told Ars Technica (http://bit.ly/LXF274ArsCtrlIQ) that Ctrl IQ remains a Tier…

1 min
try monado out today

"2021 is off to an exciting start in the land of VR on Linux. Monado, the OpenXR runtime for Linux, is now an officially conformant OpenXR implementation! The Khronos listing of conformant OpenXR 1.0 implementations, which previously included Facebook, HTC, and Microsoft, now also includes Monado, a free, open source runtime that’s passed the OpenXR conformance test suite on a simulated device. Collabora doesn’t produce any hardware, therefore anyone building a product using Monado with non-simulated hardware still needs to go through the full, normal adopter and conformance process for that product to claim OpenXR conformance and take advantage of the benefits. But that’s another story for another time. In recognition of this milestone, we’ve also made our first proper release version, moving away from the 0.X.Y version series to one which follows…

linuxforuk2104_article_007_03_01