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Lonely Planet Magazine IndiaLonely Planet Magazine India

Lonely Planet Magazine India December 2018

The world’s most trusted source on travel, Lonely Planet has made its way to India. Through vivid writing and stunning color spreads from celebrated and seasoned traveller-writers and photographers, Lonely Planet Magazine India Inspires travelers to sample different cultures first-hand, discover new people, and learn fascinating stories about every place.

Land:
India
Språk:
English
Utgiver:
Worldwide Media Private Limited
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we want to put ideas in your head!

Travel ideas. We want to give you ideas that you file away in your head, in your heart, and on your bookshelf. We want to give you features that make you call up a friend and set the wheels of travel in motion, and features that make you sink back in your chair and dream. We want you to explore every day. The world is a massive place, full of wonderful possibilities that can be bewildering in their variety, especially in our current scenario where every rupee counts against the strong dollar. Which is where the Best in Travel 2019 list comes in. Lonely Planet’s staff, writers and online community have come together to reveal a year’s worth of travel inspiration, giving you the countries, cities and regions that deserve…

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escape the grind!

Revisit the architectural secrets of Delhi, NCR The city of Delhi has been the site of seven different cities over time, and it’s best to begin your exploration of its architectural relics at the Mehrauli Archaeological Park. Walk down to the Lal Kot walls, which are said to have been built in the 11th century, and which offer spectacular views of the Qutb Minar. Make the Hazrat Nizamuddin Dargah your next stop – it's home to the grave of the Sufi saint Nizamuddin Auliya and has been an important place of pilgrimage for centuries. Take a left off the road that leads to the dargah to reach the 64-pillared Chausath Khamba mausoleum. After the Delhi Sultanate came the Mughal Empire, and a striking specimen of this period’s architecture is the Purana…

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soak in the rich history of chittoor, andhra pradesh

Out of Chennai (160km) Its proximity to Tirupati hasn’t done Chittoor any favours. If you ask cab operators why people come to Chittoor, they tend to look nonplussed. Tourists don’t come to Chittoor, they’ll say. Everyone goes to Tirumala. And that is exactly why you should go to Chittoor. Peppered with huge igneous rocks that look like playthings giants left behind, it’s a quiet, tranquil world. The temples, too, are what temples should be: serene, welcoming, surrounded by an air of calm. The Mogileswara Shiva Temple, for example, gets crowded only on festival days, and the Rama Temple at Venkatagiri seems almost forgotten. The crepe jasmine tree in the courtyard blooms throughout the year, and the entire setting encourages you to spend some time here, with just yourself for company. The Shiva…

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experience a new kind of divinity in wai, maharashtra

Out of Mumbai (228km) When it comes to temple towns, the narrative is almost always the same – quaint, peaceful and comforting. These towns welcome devout pilgrims and weary travellers alike, relaxing the body and refreshing the soul. If you are indeed on the lookout for a calm spiritual experience, Wai is not for you. We’ll cut to the chase – while Wai is definitely your quintessential ‘temple town’, it’s far from quaint and almost bursting at the seams, waiting to be explored. Start your excursion with a visit to Nana Phadnavis Wada. Nana Phadnavis, an influential statesman of the Maratha empire, built the six-sided wada (traditional mansion with an inner courtyard) on the banks of the River Krishna, when he settled in Menawali. Look out for the wada’s caretakers and ask…

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the vw camper van

SHAPED LIKE A LOAF OF BREAD, the VW campervan or Kombi is built for practicality, not speed, and its rise to stardom was likewise slow. The Volkswagen factory in Germany, a showpiece project of the Nazi regime, was destroyed in WWII. It was being rebuilt under the supervision of the British Army when Dutch car importer Ben Pon paid a visit. He had a flash of design inspiration from a flatbed utility vehicle in the factory, and sketched out a curved box on top to create a van that would hold a lot for its size. The Type 2 went on sale in 1950, and came in variants including an ice-cream van and ambulance. It really caught the imagination, however, as a passenger microbus. Followers of 1960s counter-culture in the USA…

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get your vw groove on

Rent an original campervan with O’Connors Campers, based in Devon, for Californian-style vibes around the southwest (www.oconnorscampers.co.uk). Sleep in a Bay that serves as the ‘master bedroom’ of The Coppice Woodland campsite for four in Hertfordshire (www.canopyandstars.co.uk). Grab a lobster roll from a 1957 Splitty parked in London’s Bermondsey, or follow their Twitter account for pop-up info (www.bobslobster.com). Watch the 2006 film Little Miss Sunshine: the 800-mile US road trip features a bright yellow Bay that’s a character in its own right (www.amazon.co.uk).…

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