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Lonely Planet

Lonely Planet January 2018

Feed your love of travel with award-winning Lonely Planet. Inside you'll find topical ideas for easy inspirational weekend breaks and more adventurous experiences to try out, helped by the insider knowledge of Lonely Planet's many experts around the world. You'll be taken on a journey through words and beautiful photography, with highly atmospheric features transporting you to spectacular landscapes and allowing local people to reveal their culture, history ,food, drink and the natural wonders that surround them.

Land:
United Kingdom
Språk:
English
Utgiver:
BBC Worldwide Limited
Hyppighet:
Back issues only
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1 min.
editor’s note

Making each issue of Lonely Planet magazine is always a fun and mind-expanding experience – this month it has also given me both the sweats and the chills! Within these pages the heat first gets dialled up in a seemingly improbable place, high in the Japan Alps (p68). In this home of hot-spring-dwelling snow monkeys and ancient traditions kept raucously alive, the annual Nozawa Onsen Fire Festival sees a towering bonfire lit in tribute to the spirits said to inhabit the surrounding mountains. A blend of sunshine and fearsome chillies keep the temperature rising as local chefs guide us through some of Mexico’s most authentic dishes (p80), while the photographer Charlotte Curd presents her take on Sydney’s beach culture (p100), right now basking in the height of summer. Back in…

2 min.
behind the scenes

WELCOME TO THE TEAM! Catriona Grew is our new editorial assistant. We quizzed her on what travel experiences she’ll be bringing to the mix: WHERE I GREW UP Half in west London, half in York. LAST TRIP I TOOK Exploring ancient Greek ruins in Athens. FAVOURITE TRAVEL DESTINATION TO DATE Varanasi, because it’s multicoloured and mind-blowing. WHERE I’D MOST LIKE TO GO Lalibela in Ethiopia, for the rock-cut churches. Or Tibet, to see the roof of the world. Or Iran, or the Arctic… so many places! GREATEST SURPRISE ON MY TRAVELS One morning in Hampi, in southern India, my friend and I woke up at 4am to catch a train, only to find the monsoon had hit overnight. The stream you could splash across the day before had turned into a torrent. We were stranded on the wrong side, in the…

4 min.
postcards

LYSEFJORD, NORWAY Golden moment I spent a month travelling with my wife in our van through Denmark, Sweden and Norway. The photo was taken in Lysebotn, a small and beautiful village at the end of Lysefjord in Norway. We arrived at noon and walked around, almost alone, discovering the place. I love the golden hour – it’s my favourite moment of the day – so we decided to sit and watch the sun slowly disappear in the background, dyeing the fjord many different colours. The silence was interrupted only by seals in the water. Suddenly, a solitary kayak began to cross the fjord in front of us. I quickly picked up my camera to capture this scene. GALÁPAGOS, ECUADOR Sleepy lion This sea lion was the first one I saw on Isla Santa Cruz and…

1 min.
globetrotter

Natural high VERTIGO SUFFERERS, LOOK AWAY NOW. A new film about mountains allows viewers to vicariously experience the lure of the peaks, following adventurers as they cling to rock faces and barrel through mountain windows (for a taster, see this still from the film). With a classical score performed by the Australian Chamber Orchestra and a haunting narration read byWillemDafoe, Mountainexploresthe spellbinding power of high places. We caught up with BAFTA-nominated director Jennifer Peedom to learn more. WHERE WAS THE FILM SHOT? All over the world, but especially in the Himalayas, Alaska, Canada and Utah. Locations were driven by cinematography, in a way it really didn’t matter where it was: it was about the human experience. WHY DO YOU THINK WE FIND MOUNTAINS SO IRRESISTIBLE? They give us a sense of perspective, and make us feel…

3 min.
hot shot

HOW DID YOU FIRST GET INTO PHOTOGRAPHY? As a child I loved to draw and paint, but at 12 years old I decided I wanted to be a photographer. I saved my money and bought myself a secondhand Pentax SLR. I grew up on Anglesey in North Wales and the landscape was a natural subject to photograph. My parents would take me out to shoot locally, whether it was the rugged coastline of Anglesey or the dramatic scenery of Snowdonia. WHAT APPEALS ABOUT TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY? At the risk of stating the obvious, I love to travel. However, the camera has changed the way I travel. Photography gives me purpose in a destination and a reason to be in places that ordinarily I wouldn’t be given the opportunity to visit. WHAT DO YOU TAKE WITH…

2 min.
something to declare

“There are many travellers who would never dream of setting foot in an Irish pub. They are too busy immersing themselves in the local culture, partying in hidden spaces, browsing art and absorbing history in areas far from sightseeing bus tours. I get that. I do. I’m there. Too much, perhaps. Which is why – exhausted after days of rolling in at dawn and conversing in fragments of a new language – I occasionally find myself stepping, foot-weary and frazzled, into an Irish pub. Yes, it is the easy option. But I am on holiday. This is not an endurance test. Essentially, Irish pubs are a global network of safe spaces for the English-speaking diaspora. The staff may well be Kiwis and Cockneys, but they speak your language. There is beer you…