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Nyheter og politikk
Newsweek

Newsweek 1/24-1/31/2020

Newsweek magazine is able to fill the gaps when a story has passed and is able to come up with insight or synthesis that connects the cracking, confusing digitals dots in today's fast paced news cycle. Topics regularly covered include politics and government, business and entertainment, health and nutrition, science and technology, money and culture. Get Newsweek digital magazine subscription today.

Land:
United States
Språk:
English
Utgiver:
The Newsweek/Daily Beast Company LLC
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I denne utgaven

1 min.
newsweek

GLOBAL EDITOR-IN-CHIEF _ Nancy Cooper CREATIVE DIRECTOR _ Michael Goesele EDITORIAL DIRECTOR _ Hank Gilman EXECUTIVE EDITOR _ Diane Harris DIGITAL DIRECTOR _ Laura Davis US NEWS DIRECTOR _ Juliana Pignataro MANAGING EDITOR _ Melissa Jewsbury SPECIAL PROJECTS EDITOR _ Fred Guterl EDITORIAL Senior Editors _ Tufayel Ahmed, Peter Carbonara, Tara Francis Chan, Erika Hobbs, Meredith Wolf Schizer Deputy Editors _ Jennifer Doherty, Christopher Groux (Gaming), Matt Keeley (Night), Scott McDonald (Sports), Donica Phifer, Christina Zhao Associate Editors _ David Chiu, James Etherington-Smith, Hannah Osborne (Science), Dom Passantino London Sub-Editor _ Hannah Partos Copy Chief _ Elizabeth Rhodes Ernst Contributing Editor, Opinion _ Lee Habeeb Editorial Assistant _ Emmy Espinal CREATIVE Director of Photography _ Diane Rice Contributing Art Director _ Michael Bessire Associate Art Director _ Paul Naughton Digital Imaging Specialist _ Katy Lyness Art Assistant _ Elizaveta Galkina WRITERS Steven Asarch, David Brennan, Nina Burleigh, Dan Cancian, Brendan Cole, Shane Croucher,…

1 min.
the archives

1995 “Blood, race, celebrity, lust, love, sex, brutality: this case has had it all,” Newsweek reported on The People v. O.J. Simpson. In the trial of the former football star, the “prosecution and defense battled over evidence that portrayed Simpson as a brutal wife batterer and a key police witness as a racist.” A Newsweek poll revealed “82 percent of Americans” expected to follow the case, generating “the most publicized murder trial in history.” With the public divided largely along racial lines, Simpson was finally acquitted, and the murders of Nicole Brown and Ronald Goldman remain unsolved. 1973 “Harsh winter weather was biting more deeply all across America” and “fuel shortages began to plague the nation,” Newsweek wrote. The country faced “long-range prospects of brownouts” and “diplomatic repercussions in the oil-rich Middle East.”…

7 min.
a cure for your holiday debt hangover

THAT QUEASY FEELING YOU GOT LAST MONTH after you overindulged at a holiday party or knocked back one too many glasses of bubbly on New Year’s Eve? Chances are you may suffer a similar sensation this month when your credit card bills show up—stark proof of the toll your holiday travels, entertaining and generosity are taking on your finances. Plenty of people share your pain. The typical consumer racked up more than $1,300 in debt over the holidays, according to a MagnifyMoney survey, with Gen-Xers owing the most, at $2,076 on average. Compounding the problem: Seven in 10 borrowers already had a balance on their credit card before the giving season began. “It isn’t splurging for that one big, expensive gift—the car with the bow in the commercials—but all of the hundreds…

4 min.
meghan markle’s mutiny

IN A TOTALLY UNANTICIPATED public statement earlier this month, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex mutinied against a monarchical institution, confronted vicious media outlets and common disparagers, and chose more freedom for themselves and their baby boy. Horrified traditionalists blame the uppity, black American wife. Harry was their darling, Officer Prince until the hussy got under his skin, into his head and heart. Best-selling English novelist Sir Philip Pullman named and shamed their racism in a tweet and concluded: “This really is a foul country.” So why should they not escape from it? When Harry wed Meghan in 2018, the sun shone, birds sang, crowds cheerfully waved their wee union flags. The world loves performative British Royal weddings, but this one came loaded with symbolism. Idealistic white people and minorities whipped up…

1 min.
talking points

“We intend to step back as ‘senior’ members of the Royal Family and work to become financially independent.”—PRINCE HARRY AND MEGHAN MARKLE“I HAD TO PITCH PRETTY HARD ON ONE OF THEM.”—SENATOR ELIZABETH WARREN ON GETTING HER BROTHERS' VOTES“Mr. Weinstein, is this really the way that you want to end up in jail for the rest of your life, by texting and violating a court order?”—JUDGE JAMES BURKE TO HARVEY WEINSTEIN OVER USING HIS PHONE IN COURT“I have not fled justice—I have escaped injustice and political persecution.”—FORMER NISSAN CHAIRMAN CARLOS GHOSN“ONCE YOU OVERCOME THE ONE-INCH-TALL BARRIER OF SUBTITLES, YOU WILL BE INTRODUCED TO SO MANY MORE AMAZING FILMS.”—Parasite director Bong Joon-ho“If you want free Netflix please use someone else’s account like the rest of us.”—NETFLIX INDIA“‘DON’T BE EVIL’ WAS NO LONGER…

21 min.
the nigerian century

IT’S MIDNIGHT IN A MEDIEVAL palace in the oldest city in West Africa: Kano, Nigeria. A thousand years ago, this was one of the richest cities in the world, the terminus of the cross-Saharan trade that brought guns and salt to exchange for slaves, gold and ivory. The palace has 5-foot thick walls, floor-to-ceiling bookshelves, stone pathways and ornate mosaic domes. On the walls are large color photographs of a serious-looking man wearing a white turban with a veil across the bottom of his face. The two tails of the ceremonial knot that holds the veil in place look like bunny ears. The man is Muhammadu Sanusi II, the 14th emir of Kano, the second most important religious position in Nigeria. I watch as his assistant crawls across the carpet on…