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Popular WoodworkingPopular Woodworking

Popular Woodworking

August 2019

Whether it's a solo or group project, a home-improvement undertaking or a simple piece of art, Popular Woodworking lets you into the world of woodworking crafts. Each issue of Popular Woodworking features numerous projects for the expert craftsperson and the interested beginner.

Land:
United States
Språk:
English
Utgiver:
F+W Media, Inc. - Magazines
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I DENNE UTGAVEN

access_time3 min.
learning patience

I often question whether or not I’m getting better at woodworking. I can saw a straight line with a hand saw, take paper-thin shavings with a plane, use power tools safely and even turn four very similar-looking table legs on the lathe. But those are all things I learned to do very early on. There was a lot of growth in my woodworking abilities in that first year, but since then, progress feels like it’s slowed. Each piece of furniture I make seems to take more time than the last. I’m generally happier with the things I make today than even a few years ago. That’s due, in part, to woodworking being the way I relax and de-stress. For me, nothing beats a few hours of uninterrupted shop time with some…

access_time2 min.
tools

Twin Turbo Vise There’s a new twin-screw vise on the block designed by Andy Klein that I’ve had the opportunity to test in a pre-production form. The design seeks to solve some of the common issues associated with twin-screw vises. The solid transmission of power through the gears promises to reduce backlash and stretch associated with chain drives. It also features two speeds that are switched by pushing the handle in and pulling it out, connecting with gears of different sizes. This action operates smoothly on my vise and allows the vise to open to full capacity quickly. The 20” version I’ve tested provides 17” of capacity between the screws, a luxury I’ve not experienced before. Overall, I found the vise to be promising. The only issue I encountered was some…

access_time1 min.
popular woodworking

AUGUST 2019, VOL. 39, NO. 4 PUBLISHER Patty Craft EDITOR IN CHIEF Andrew Zoellner SENIOR EDITOR David Lyell SENIOR DESIGNER Danielle Lowery VIDEO PRODUCER David Thiel WEB PRODUCER Rachel Fountain CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Bob Flexner EDITORIAL CONTACT popwood@fwmedia.com 513-531-2690 F+W MEDIA, INC. CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Gregory J. Osberg SVP, GENERAL MANAGER F+W FINE ART, WRITING, OUTDOORS SMALL BUSINESS GROUPS Ray Chelstowski VP, CONSUMER MARKETING John Phelan VP, DIGITAL Jason Revzon VP, PRODUCT MANAGEMENT Pat Fitzgerald ADVERTISING VP, ADVERTISING SALES Kevin Smith ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Don Schroder 331 N. Arch St., Allentown, PA 18104 tel. 610-821-4425; fax. 610-821-7884 d. d.schroder@verizon.net ADVERTISING SALES COORDINATOR Connie Kostrzewa715-445-4612 x13883 connie.kostrzewa@fwmedia.com NEWSSTAND SALES Scott T. scott.hill@procirc.com…

access_time2 min.
workshop tips

Square the Table for Accuracy Square the table using this old machinists’ trick. Bend a piece of ¼”. steel rod (available at home centers) into an S shape, as shown in the photo above. Mount it in the chuck and swing it by hand to each side of the table. Use a feeler gauge between the end of the rod and the tabletop to test the clearance at each end of the table. Adjust the table tilt until there’s 0.003” or less difference between the two sides. —George Vondriska Clothespin Holder I love having a cutting list close at hand. But hanging on to it when both hands are busy was a problem—until I bought 24 clothespins for $2 at the hardware store. I epoxied the wooden pins in convenient spots around my…

access_time4 min.
the wedged mortise & tenon

This bedstead I’m building is a perfect place to use a joint that I rarely cut: the wedged, through-mortise and tenon. I need to be able to ship this bedstead across the country, so I wanted something the customer (with some simple instructions) would be able to assemble herself. The head and foot are all joined in the “usual” manner; pinned mortise and tenon joints. But the long rails connect these two sections with a through-mortise and tenon joint that’s then wedged through the extended tenon. I’ve seen it called a “tusk” tenon, a wedge tenon (although there are other kinds of wedged tenons, too) and a “keyed” tenon. Whatever you call it, this is a joint that can really pull things together, but if need be, can be disassembled. The rails…

access_time4 min.
understanding lines & edges

Nice Lines. We say those words to describe a well-designed boat, sports car, chair or saw handle. It expresses our pleasure when all the parts of a design seem to flow together to give it a sense of motion and life. Finding that sweet spot with flowing lines is like catching lightning in a bottle. Lines are really just edges where two surfaces come together. Edges play a variety of roles in design. Understanding the potential of both elements can help you achieve your goals when designing furniture. Lost in Space The photo of wooden hand planes below shows the role that lines play in design. Note that the backdrop in the photo gives the illusion that the tools are floating in an infinite space. It’s not magic, just a simple photographer’s…

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