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Popular WoodworkingPopular Woodworking

Popular Woodworking June 2019

Whether it's a solo or group project, a home-improvement undertaking or a simple piece of art, Popular Woodworking lets you into the world of woodworking crafts. Each issue of Popular Woodworking features numerous projects for the expert craftsperson and the interested beginner.

Land:
United States
Språk:
English
Utgiver:
Active Interest Media
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KJØP UTGAVE
NOK64.04
ABONNER
NOK164.83
7 Utgaver

I DENNE UTGAVEN

access_time2 min.
doing more with less

We all face constraints. In the woodworking world, there are three that I’m always balancing: time, tools and space. I don’t build things nearly as much as I should. With an old house (circa 1906), much of my woodworking time turns into fixing and matching trim, reframing walls and carefully removing plaster and lathe, so as not to damage more of it than I have to. There’s also a fair amount of detective work and bargaining going on: Where did this wire come from? Why are there three doorbell transformers? How far out of level is too far? In essence, a quick home repair quickly turns into a time suck. On the tools front, I’m very fortunate. Very rarely am I lacking in what I need to make or build or…

access_time3 min.
inbox

Simple Outdoor Finishes I need to build an outside door that will withstand the weather. Do you have simple plans that will work for me? Larry Butterworth Here’s my finishing contribution to the question. Wood outside needs to be protected against two elements: ultra-violet light from the sun; and water from rain. So if your door is covered, any indoor finish will work well. Otherwise, to protect against UV light pigment works best, so several coats of paint are best. Paint also protects well against water. If you want a clear finish, boat varnishes are best because they contain UV-resistant additives. You’ll need to go to a marina near a coast to get them. They are rarely sold in common paint stores or home centers. Common brands are Z-Spar, Interlux, Epifanes and Pettit. They all…

access_time5 min.
tools

Woodpeckers Slab Flattening Mill There’s no denying the popularity of live edge slab furniture (I’ve even seen full slabs wrapped in plastic at the big box store). Just add legs and you’ve got yourself a coffee table. However, if you don’t purchase a pre-flattened slab, your first task will be to make a flattening jig. While building this jig isn’t the most difficult task, there comes a time when you need precision and reliability that doesn’t leave you wondering. I found the Woodpeckers Slab Flattening Mill to be a pretty incredible system. The extruded aluminum rails are robust. Their profile leaves no possibility for sagging (my main concern with plywood jigs). Once the rails are secured to your worktable, they are rock solid. The carriage that rides upon the rails uses the same…

access_time1 min.
workshop tips

Benchtop Lazy Susan I finally got fed up with rummaging through a drawer of small screwdrivers, nail sets and dental picks to find the one tool I needed. I built a revolving tool stand to make them more accessible. The stand is composed of three layers, glued together, and mounted on a 6" lazy susan bearing (www.leevalley.com, #12K01.03, $4.20). The bottom layer is 2" thick and 8" square; the middle layer is 1" thick and 6" square; the top layer is 1" thick and 4" square. I drilled lots of holes for my tools in the 1" rim on each layer and on top. —Randall H. Morse All Bases Covered Every few years, I give my shop a thorough cleaning. When I discovered that the base of my drill press had been harboring fugitives—drill…

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popular woodworking

POPULARWOODWORKING.COM JUNE 2019, VOL. 39, NO. 3 GROUP PUBLISHER Allison Dolan PUBLISHER Patty Craft EDITOR IN CHIEF Andrew Zoellner SENIOR EDITOR David Lyell SENIOR DESIGNER Danielle Lowery VIDEO PRODUCER David Thiel VIDEO GRAPHER AND VIDEO EDITOR Jacob Motz WEB PRODUCER Rachel Fountain CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Bob Flexner EDITORIAL CONTACT popwood@fwmedia.com 513-531-2690 F+W MEDIA, INC. CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Gregory J. Osberg SVP, GENERAL MANAGER F+W FINE ART, WRITING, OUT-DOORS & SMALL BUSINESS GROUPS Ray Chelstowski VP, CONSUMER MARKETING John Phelan VP, DIGITAL Jason Revzon VP, PRODUCT MANAGEMENT Pat Fitzgerald ADVERTISING VP, ADVERTISING SALES Kevin Smith ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Don Schroder 331 N. Arch St., Allentown, PA 18104 tel. 610-821-4425; fax. 610-821-7884 d.schroder@verizon.net ADVERTISING SALES COORDINATOR Connie Kostrzewa 715-445-4612 x13883 connie.kostrzewa@fwmedia.com NEWSSTAND SALES Scott T. Hill scott.hill@procirc.com…

access_time5 min.
resawing by hand

The hardwoods I use are almost always riven or split from a log. When I need thinner pieces than usual, I split them again. But there are times when I have mill-sawn stock and the way to get that thinner is either plane it down or resaw it. Ripping boards through their thickness rather than their width is resawing. Doing this work by hand is more manageable than you might think; but it does require some strength and patience. Recently, a shop cleaning uncovered a few scraps of black walnut; quartersawn boards no less. They were 1 ¼" thick, about 6" wide and 20" long. They were ideal for a carved box but needed to be halved, both to get enough material and to reduce the bulk for the scale of the…

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