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The Economist Continental Europe Edition The Economist Continental Europe Edition

The Economist Continental Europe Edition

June 22, 2019

The Economist is the premier source for the analysis of world business and current affairs, providing authoritative insight and opinion on international news, world politics, business, finance, science and technology, as well as overviews of cultural trends and regular Special reports on industries and countries.

Land:
United Kingdom
Språk:
English
Utgiver:
The Economist Newspaper Limited - Europe
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I DENNE UTGAVEN

access_time8 min.
the world this week

Politics Iran said it would soon exceed the limits on nuclear fuel that are part of a deal it signed with America and other powers in 2015. It may also begin enriching uranium to levels closer to those of a bomb. America, which pulled out of the deal last year, said Iran was behind the recent attacks on two commercial ships in the Strait of Hormuz and sent 1,000 more troops to the region. America confirmed that Iran shot down one of its drones. Muhammad Morsi, the only democratically elected president of Egypt, died. Mr Morsi took office in 2012, after the Arab spring. But he was deposed in a coup in 2013 and thrown in prison along with other leaders of the Muslim Brotherhood. He was in court on charges of…

access_time5 min.
which boris would britain get?

THE BREXIT monster unleashed three years ago this weekend has already devoured two British prime ministers. David Cameron surrendered hours after the referendum result was announced on June 24th 2016. Theresa May began confidently but soon found herself cornered. Conservative MPs have drawn up a shortlist of candidates to replace her as their leader and thus as prime minister; party members will make a decision by the end of July. The overwhelming favourite among both MPs and activists is Boris Johnson. But which Boris Johnson? The former foreign secretary, who is looked on with a mixture of amusement and contempt in European capitals, has assumed different guises at different times. As mayor of liberal, cosmopolitan London in 2008-16 he preached the virtues of immigration and the single market. As a leading…

access_time5 min.
texafornia dreaming

IN THE CABLE-NEWS version of America, the president sits in the White House issuing commands that transform the nation. Life is not like that. In the real version of America many of the biggest political choices are made not in Washington but by the states—and by two of them in particular. Texas and California are the biggest, brashest, most important states in the union, each equally convinced that it is the future (see our Special report in this issue). For the past few decades they have been heading in opposite directions, creating an experiment that reveals whether America works better as a low-tax, low-regulation place in which government makes little provision for its citizens (Texas), or as a high-tax, highly regulated one in which it is the government’s role to tackle…

access_time3 min.
china’s chance

IT WAS PROBABLY the largest political protest ever staged in Hong Kong. It may have been the biggest in China’s history. Organisers reckon that about 1.9m people joined the demonstration on June 16th. Even during the unrest in Tiananmen Square three decades ago, no single protest approached that scale. The estimate may not be reliable. But there is no disputing the impact of this display of discontent, and others leading up to it. It came only a week after another demonstration of jaw-dropping size and four days after one that escalated into Hong Kong’s most violent disorder since the 1960s. The territory’s government and its overlords in Beijing could not have received a clearer message that Hong Kongers distrust their own leaders, as well as the central government’s (see China section).…

access_time3 min.
click here to buy libra

FOR YEARS Wall Street’s magnates have worried that Silicon Valley’s giants will shake up finance. Facebook thinks it has found a way. It will launch a digital currency, the Libra, in 2020. Mark Zuckerberg’s firm has failed before to popularise a payments service. And it is an unlikely guardian of other peoples’ money, given its habit of privacy abuses and evasion. But like or loathe the company, its new scheme has legs. The Libra’s value will be pegged to a basket of major currencies, it will be able to handle large transaction volumes and 28 other big firms say they will join a consortium backing the currency. If Facebook’s 2.4bn users adopt Libra to shop and transfer money, it could become one of the world’s biggest financial entities. That would…

access_time3 min.
reigning cats and dogs

THERE IS A range of theories about how Homo sapiens came to rule the planet. Opposable thumbs, cranial size, altruism and cooking all played a part, but central to the naked ape’s success was its ability to dominate other species. Bovids, equids and, in particular, canids, were put to work by H. sapiens; felids always took a slightly different view of the matter, but were indulged for their rodent-catching talents. As humanity has got richer, animals’ roles have changed. People need their services less than before. Fewer wolves and bandits meant less demand for dogs for protection; the internal-combustion engine made horses redundant; modern sanitation kept rats in check and made cats less useful. No longer necessities, domestic animals became luxuries. Pet-keeping seems to kick in en masse when household incomes…

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