EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Art & Architecture
Architectural Digest India

Architectural Digest India September 2019

AD India's September issue gives you an exclusive 'Behind the Scenes' look at Mira Nair's glossy TV interpretation of Vikram Seth's novel, 'A Suitable Boy'. Made in close collaboration with the cult status filmmaker, AD reveals yet-to-be-seen stills from the show and an entire design docket from her first recce to Lucknow. AD also presents must-see coverage of the first digital launches from Milan Design Week, with the hottest brands and most interesting designers. This is the Salone Report in an all-new avatar.

Country:
India
Language:
English
Publisher:
Conde Nast India Pvt. Ltd
Frequency:
Bimonthly
Read More
SPECIAL: Save 40% on your subscription!
SUBSCRIBE
$22.19$13.31
6 Issues

in this issue

2 min.
the style issue

Like an elegant old aunty of South Bombay, Flora Fountain drips with style. We’d been waiting for it to reopen for a long time. The longer conservation architect Vikas Dilawari’s restoration took, the more elaborate our plans to celebrate this Mumbai landmark became. By the time the scaffolding and ugly hoardings were removed earlier this year, we’d developed the idea of a single shot of a model frolicking in the water spray into a cover story that recreated the iconic scene of Fellini’s La Dolce Vita where Anita Ekberg wades through Trevi Fountain under a moonlit sky. And so I found myself at a 9pm call time one Sunday in July, with a large swathe of Fort shut down just for us (kudos to AD’s photo assistant, Talib Chitalwala, for…

6 min.
contributors

MANISH ARORA fashion designer This New Delhi-based designer showcased his unique aesthetic and signature palettes in ‘The Mood’ (pg 264). “It was a group effort to pull off this mood board. It was a great experience working with the AD team. They were open and welcoming to ideas and suggestions.” RAJASHREE BALARAM writer The Mumbai-based freelance writer visited chef Alex Sanchez at his latest restaurant in ‘American Dream’ (pg 110). “The precision Alex seeks in every tiny detail of his restaurant, be it the shade of wall paint, the density of crockery or the cut of every ice cube, speaks volumes about the passion he has invested in his dream. I felt inspired writing his story.” RICHARD HOLKAR writer Holkar writes about the modern style leanings of his father, Maharaja Yeshwantrao Holkar II, in ‘The Modern Maharaja’ (pg…

1 min.
launch pad

Yves Gastou and his son Victor of the eponymous Parisian gallery are known for their revival of furniture styles from past decades—from the 1940s to the 1980s. Expressing this spirit of revivalism is their reissue of François Cante-Pacos’s furniture pieces under the Futuristic Furniture collection. As PAD London opens this month (from 30 September to 6 October), the works of the Gastous will be on display. Their exquisite craftsmanship can be witnessed in the limited-edition two-door ‘Cyclade’ cabinet in red lacquer and walnut wood (pictured). As a haunt for museum-quality pieces, PAD London is a must-visit for design connoisseurs; a fitting platform to showcase this retro-chic offering from Galerie Yves Gastou. (pad-fairs.com)…

2 min.
skyline stars

Hosting a luxury French brand’s fashion show inside a defunct American airport terminal that will soon reopen as a hotel represents, perhaps, everything Louis Vuitton stands for—the spirit of travel, glamour, and a touch of inventive playfulness. With its Cruise 2020 collection, the fashion show also showcased, at the TWA Flight Center, the trans-Atlantic dialogue between Paris and New York that began in the 19th century with the first exhibition of the maison’s products at the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair. But Louis Vuitton’s Cruise 2020 collection is not about the old—or at least, it’s not only about it. “It’s about rediscovering an uncommon place that is yet a part of American heritage,” says Nicolas Ghesquière, the brand’s creative director. And uncommon it certainly is. Designed by late Finnish architect Eero Saarinen,…

2 min.
paige turner

Had social media exploded on the scene in the 1980s, photographer Paige Powell would have been an Instagram sensation, a celebrated influencer with a legion following, ‘friended’ innumerable times on Facebook and with uncountable likes for her albums. As it was, social media was a few decades behind, keeping intact the exclusivity contained within Paige Powell—a set of three books released this April, supported by Gucci and published by Dashwood Books. The Portland-based photographer moved to New York in 1981, having fallen for the city when her job as an apparel promotions manager for a sporting brand took her there frequently. “I stayed up 24 hours a day, squeezing trips to the Metropolitan Museum in between work, and, at night, Studio 54 […] and I thought ‘I’ve got to get here.…

2 min.
performing art

The Metropolitan Museum of Art holds a collection of artworks that can be seen as a pan-continental exposition on 20,000 years of humanity. This month, Nikhil Chopra—an artist with an elastic oeuvre of live art, painting, sculpture and more—will add to this exposition with his participation in the institution’s MetLiveArts Fall 2019 programme. Chopra’s introduction to The Met was through Shanay Jhaveri—the museum’s assistant curator of South Asian art in the Department of Modern and Contemporary Art—whom he first met in 2010. “He visited my performance at the Bhau Daji Lad museum in Mumbai with Chatterjee & Lal. Since then, there has been a mutual interest in each other’s development,” says Chopra. That led to an invitation to create something for The Met that would “challenge the workings of a major…