Australian HiFi

November - December 2021

Australian HiFi is the definitive magazine for discerning listeners and Hi-Fi enthusiasts. Every issue is packed with equipment and music reviews, new product information and ‘how-to’ articles. Australian Hi-Fi magazine is dedicated to helping you find the best quality sound for your home.

Country:
Australia
Language:
English
Publisher:
Future Publishing Ltd
Frequency:
Bimonthly
$4.28
$22.90
7 Issues

in this issue

3 min
better than sex

Researchers at McGill University in Montreal have proved what audiophiles have known all along: listening to music is better than having sex. OK, so I’ve tweaked that introduction just a little, because what Dr. Robert Zatorre, neuroscientist at The Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, at McGill University, actually discovered was that: “the pleasurable experience of listening to music releases dopamine, a neurotransmitter in the brain important for the more tangible pleasures associated with rewards such as food, drugs and sex.” The results of his research, published in the journal Nature Neuroscience, are one key to the reason why music, which has no obvious survival value, is so significant across all human societies. “These findings provide neurochemical evidence that intense emotional responses to music involve ancient reward circuitry in the brain,” says…

23 min
soundbites

MISSION UPGRADES TWEETERS Mission has updated the QX Series of speakers it launched in 2017 to MkII status. All new models feature a new 38mm diameter ring-radiator style tweeter and newly engineered ‘DiaDrive’ bass/midrange drivers. Mission’s new tweeter uses a different construction to typical soft dome tweeters. In most soft dome tweeters the voice coil is connected to the outer circumference of the dome so as the dome moves ‘out’ into the room, the centre of the dome can collapse inwards due to air pressure. Various systems have been developed to counteract this, including doping the fabric to make it stiffer, and fixing the top of the dome to a strut running across the top so that it can’t collapse (as in Sonus faber’s Damped Apex Dome (DAD) tweeters). Mission’s solution is to…

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11 min
revel performa3 m105 loudspeakers

Revel is the brand-name applied to high-end loudspeakers made by the giant conglomerate Harman International (an independently controlled subsidiary of Samsung). I mention this specifically because Harman International is also the parent company behind two of the world’s best-known and highly-regarded hi-fi loudspeaker manufacturers: JBL and Infinity, which not only puts loudspeakers made by Revel on a pedestal, but also means that Revel’s engineers have access to all the same research and development facilities as the engineers at JBL and Infinity, as well as to all the same materials and manufacturing facilities. EQUIPMENT When Revel introduced the original Performa series in 1999, it was the first time that the company’s premium metal diaphragm drivers had become available on any loudspeaker other than Revel’s flagship Ultima Series models. Two different alloys were used:…

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6 min
laboratory test report

Readers interested in a full technical appraisal of the performance of the Revel Performa3 M105 Loudspeakers should continue on and read the LABORATORY TEST REPORT published on the following pages. Readers should note that the results mentioned in the report, tabulated in performance charts and/or displayed using graphsand/orphotographsshouldbeconstrued as applying only to the specific sample tested. Graph 1 shows the in-room frequency response measured by Newport Test Labs using a pink noise test signal. You can see that it is exceptionally flat, very linear and nicely extended into the very lowest and highest frequencies. Importantly, there’s no skew to the overall response that would tend to favour one frequency band over another. Looking at the section of the response between 100Hz and 10kHz, which is the three decades (or seven octaves) where…

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12 min
march audio p452 stereo power amplifier

You’d be forgiven for not having heard of March Audio, because it’s a relatively new outfit, formed fewer than five years ago. It’s also based in Australia, which is a long way from anywhere. But it’s not just based in far-off Australia, but out in a State in the far, far west of Australia, where even Australians rarely venture on holiday. In fact it’s so far west that it’s actually called West Australia. On the basis that he’d chosen to found a high-end audio manufacturer in such a far-flung place, I had figured that March Audio’s founder, Alan March, was not Australian, and I was right. He hails from Great Britain and left a pretty good job to come to Australia, because after finishing an almost 20-year stint with Rolls-Royce Aeronautical,…

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9 min
laboratory test report

Readers interested in the technical performance of the March Audio P452 Power Amplifier should continue on and read the LABORATORY REPORT published on the following pages. Readers should note that the results mentioned in the report, tabulated in performance charts and/or displayed using graphs and/or photographs should be construed as applying only to the specific sample tested. Newport Test Labs measured the power output of the March Audio P452 as being 246-watts per channel, both channels driven into 8Ω, which is a little more than March Audio claims, and 425-watts per channel, both channels driven into 4Ω, which is exactly in accordance with March Audio’s specification. The amplifier returned identical results when a single channel was driven. It was able to deliver these high power output levels irrespective of the test…

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