Australian Road Rider Issue#125 - June 2016

THE NO.1 MAGAZINE FOR TOURING Australian Road Rider is the only Australian magazine to address the technical aspects of riding and celebrate the pure enjoyment of touring. At Australian Road Rider we know that there’s nothing like the pleasure of hitting the open road and exploring our glorious country. Purchase includes the Digital Edition and News Service. Please stay in touch via our Facebook Page.

Country:
Australia
Language:
English
Publisher:
Universal Wellbeing PTY Limited
Frequency:
Bimonthly
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6 Issues

in this issue

3 min
the mongolian situation

“At that point you’ll suddenly see the personalities who were born to clash start clashing. You’ll see the stress-heads get stressed. You’ll see the alpha-types try to take charge. You’ll see the loners spend more time away from the group” Not good! My plans for a ride in Mongolia were ruined in a moment that had nothing to do with me. Two mates had a fight — a proper fight involving blood and busted teeth — and now they’re not mates. One of them was Mongolian, our connection with that exotic and amazing country. The other bloke was my connection with the trip, but now that they’ve fallen out they’ve called the whole thing off. Oh well, it happens. After being very disappointed by the sudden turn of events, I looked at it…

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2 min
bring your own

Riders will be able to import a new motorcycle or car from 2018 without having to deal with a dealer as long as the model is not already imported into Australia. They will also be able to import used vehicles more than 25 years old without having to pay the $12,000 duty. The Federal Chamber of Automotive Industries (FCAI) has warned that the Federal government move will take out the “buyer beware” sentiment, leaving motorists exposed to “high-risk situations” Private low-volume importing of motor vehicles was popular a few years ago, but has dropped off, with the massive decline in the Australian dollar making it uneconomical. The new government move will allow riders to import motorbikes that are not brought in as long as they have comparable standards to Australia, are no…

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1 min
dangerous senior

“Wheelies, lane splitting, overtaking on unbroken lines including when traffic is passing in the opposite direction, and speeds of 190km/h in country lanes and a top speed of 245km/h on a highway” A60-year-old British motorcyclist has been sentenced to two years’ jail for dangerous driving based on evidence from his action camera SD card. Robert Hammond was arrested by two Sussex police after he was seen popping a wheelie on his Honda Fireblade and travelling at 130km/h in an 80km/h zone. The police seized his motorbike and his camera’s memory card, which included 150 clips that led to further offences. They included many more wheelies, lane splitting, overtaking on unbroken single and double white lines including when traffic is passing in the opposite direction, speeds of 180km/h in a 50km/h zone and…

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2 min
fair cop

An American rider who was rammed by an unmarked police car after a five-minute pursuit and then kicked in the chest has successfully sued the officer for $181,170 in damages. Aprilia rider Justin Wilkens filed a complaint against Oregon State Trooper Lieutenant Rob Edwards for excessive force, but it was dismissed by the district attorney’s office and the officer has since been promoted to captain. So Justin decided to sue for damages after paying $31,000 in medical bills from a broken clavicle and fractured rib. It all started in August 2012 when the officer, driving an unmarked black Camaro patrol car, saw Justin speeding and overtaking cars across double lines. He began pursuing Justin with his red and blue lights flashing, but no siren. Justin says he didn’t know he was being…

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1 min
top techy

“Brenden was judged best-of-the-best for 2015 and has been appointed as a national ambassador for Australian Apprenticeships” Motorcycle technician Brenden Williamson is the Australian School-based Apprentice of the Year. Competing against a field of more than 200 school-based trainees from around the country, Brenden was judged best-of-the-best for 2015 and has been appointed national ambassador for Australian Apprenticeships. Brenden works at Kawasaki and Yamaha dealership On Two Wheels Motorsports in Campbelltown, NSW. He also mentors new recruits to the Yamaha Student Grand Prix Partnership, a program which aims to connect school students and younger people in the community with a workplace or business, and helped set up his employer relationship. The 22nd Australian Training Awards, presented by the Federal Department of Education and Training, are the peak national awards for the vocational education…

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2 min
training causes over-confidence

“A careful balance must be achieved in training to ensure riders do not develop unrealistic confidence in their ability” On-road motorcycle training does not reduce the risk of crashing but makes riders more cocky, leading to higher risk behaviour such as speeding, an Australian university study has found. It also reported that these riders spent more time riding, which means they are longer on the road and therefore statistically more likely to be involved in an incident. The study of 2399 newly licensed provisional riders recruited in Victoria was conducted from May 2010 to October 2012. It was funded by the Victorian Government Motorcycle Safety Levy, paid by all state riders in their annual registration fee. The riders were put through a VicRide coaching program put together by the Monash University Accident Research…

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