Australian Road Rider Issue#131 - December 2016

THE NO.1 MAGAZINE FOR TOURING Australian Road Rider is the only Australian magazine to address the technical aspects of riding and celebrate the pure enjoyment of touring. At Australian Road Rider we know that there’s nothing like the pleasure of hitting the open road and exploring our glorious country. Purchase includes the Digital Edition and News Service. Please stay in touch via our Facebook Page.

Country:
Australia
Language:
English
Publisher:
Universal Wellbeing PTY Limited
Frequency:
Bimonthly
$3.72
$20.17
6 Issues

in this issue

3 min
golden years

The publication is a reflection of everyone who likes their motorcycles and their freedom to ride them anywhere and everywhere. This year gave us a perfect lesson in how motorcycling just gets better and better. It has been a golden year, as you’ll see in our feature this issue. There have been incredible highlights. Who’d have thought laws could get better? We’ve seen them improved, though — not just lane filtering, but sensible helmet laws in a country built on blind bureaucracy and heavy-handed policing. The fact that the legislators — our politicians — listened to our lobbyists and pushed aside the resistance to change is a refreshing new deal for those of us who grew up seeing ever-restrictive rules being imposed through the years. I hope it keeps going. Most of all,…

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2 min
road to recovery

MARK Sales of road bikes rose 4.4 per cent in the first half of the year, one of the biggest half-year increases since the GFC in 2009. After last year leap-frogging Honda to the top of road bike sales, Harley-Davidson remains on top with 20.4 per cent of the 22,921 road bike market according to figures released by the Federal Chamber of Automotive Industries. Biggest sellers for Harley were again the learner-approved Street 500 in fifth overall and the Softail Breakout in ninth. Harley, with 4685 sales, was followed closely by Honda, which sold 4500 for a 19.6 per cent market share, having the top-selling bike in the country, the NBC 110 postie bike, and the Africa Twin leaping to the top of the adventure category. Third was Yamaha (3541, 15.4 per cent),…

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2 min
better roads reduce bike crashes

“The report recommends that engineering decisions on roadworks and planning should consider motorcycles, even if outside of existing design warrants” Roads need to be better designed, funded and maintained to reduce the risk of motorcycle crashes, a 244-page Austroads report has found. The report, titled “Infrastructure Improvements to Reduce Motorcycle Casualties”, is the result of a two-year study to identify infrastructure improvements to reduce motorcycle crash risk and crash severity. It says motorcycles should be identified as a separate road user group and considered as a “design vehicle” when planning and maintaining roads. The report recommends that engineering decisions on roadworks and planning should consider motorcycles, “even if outside of existing design warrants”. That’s great news for riders as the current trend seems to be to ignore riders when situating and selecting roadside…

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2 min
draggin jeans wins design award

“Draggin Jeans has won a ‘best of the best’ award for its Holeshot jeans and its boss has crash-tested a pair — by accident!” Australian motorcycle jeans company Draggin Jeans has won a “best of the best” award for its Holeshot jeans and its boss has crash-tested a pair — by accident! The award in the inaugural Motorcycle Brand Contest run by the German Design Council was the second won by Holeshot after its 2014 Red Dot Product Design Award for its “seamless fashion design”. Draggin Jeans founder and boss Grant Macintosh should be able to confirm the protective qualities of the jeans as he was wearing a pair when he had a serious crash in July. Grant was enjoying one of his favourite rides when he came around a corner to find…

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1 min
most common bike crash injuries

“The results come from a CDC study of data for 1,222,000 American riders who went to hospital for treatment of non-fatal injuries from 2001 to 2008” The most common injuries in motorcycle crashes are to the riders’ feet or legs, according to leading US public health institute the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). If you fall, you immediately put your hands out to protect yourself, yet hands and arms were actually much lower on the scale of injuries than feet or legs, which represent 30 per cent of non-fatal injuries. The CDC study found that the next most common location for non-fatal rider injuries was to the neck and head, accounting for 22 per cent, which is why approved helmets are mandatory in most places around the world. Third most common area…

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1 min
smart lights around the corner

“All use banking sensors to activate the cornering function” Smart cornering headlights are coming to more motorcycles now that Kawasaki is planning to introduce them on their Ninja ZX-14R. BMW was the first to introduce cornering lights on their K 1600 models, followed by KTM with the 1290 Super Adventure, Ducati with the Multistrada and now aftermarket manufacturers J.W. Speaker Corp (JWS). The BMW lights actually move while the KTM, Ducati, JWS and Kawasaki headlights switch on extra LEDs that focus on the inside of the corner. All use banking sensors to activate the cornering function. The problem with riding at night has been that the lights beam straight ahead when you turn a corner, which means you can’t see the apex. On bikes with fork-mounted fairings, the slight counter-steering angle makes it even…

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