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BBC Good Food MagazineBBC Good Food Magazine

BBC Good Food Magazine July 2019

Good Food is the UK's biggest selling food magazine, packed with triple-tested recipes and practical ideas for every meal occasion. From weekday suppers to relaxed weekend lunches, recipes are seasonal and work first time. In every issue: 100+ triple-tested recipes, everyday cooking,weekend ideas, seasonal ingredients, TV chefs, inspirational photographs and practical advice.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
BBC Worldwide Limited
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12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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welcome to july

Glasses of rosé clinking with ice, sizzling garlic prawns, and properly charred peppers – at last, it’s barbecue season. Our genius mix-and-match menu is big on Spanish flavours (p21). A slick of membrillo glaze adds extra tang to halloumi, paprika-spiked marinade gives a delicious smokiness to padron peppers, and manzanilla olives transform a simple spring onion and rice salad. And if our cover feature has given you a taste for Spain, serve José Pizarro’s Andalusian apricot sorbet for dessert (p97). This year, Good Food turns 30. The magazine launched in late 1989 and we’re kicking off the celebrations early with our great-value offer for new subscribers: £30 for 12 issues. Plus, join our first-ever cookery class pop-up (p65) to learn some new skills and recipes with the Good Food team over the last…

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dhal

This month’s food news, trends, Rachel Ama’s plant-based peanut stew and what’s on the BBC this month First on the list to try at any new restaurant serving cuisine from the Indian subcontinent is the dhal, and as the list of new openings grows longer, this is a trend that will run and run. Simple to cook, requiring time but no tricky skills, a dhal is comfort food of the highest order. It’s the dish we try to reproduce back at home, the ingredients and techniques we argue about in the office, and the recipe we each infinitely refine. Whether a rich kaali (black) dhal at Kutir (kutir.co.uk) – the stalwart and kick-starter to our obsession – Dishoom’s house dhal (dishoom. com), a soupy yellow khatti dhal from new Pakistani venue…

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have you tried ancho chillies?

What are they? You may have heard of poblano peppers; mild green chilli peppers that originate in Mexico, used widely in Mexican cuisine. Well, ancho chillies are the dried version of ripe (red) poblano peppers, which, as a result of the drying process, are black-red and wrinkled. What do they taste like? Dried ancho chillies are fairly mild, sweet and smoky with a fruity, raisin-like flavour and chocolaty notes. They have a deep chilli flavour and a mild heat. What should I do with them? Common in Mexican cooking, rehydrated ancho chillies can be used in sauces for enchiladas, chilli con carne and mole. They can also be blitzed up and used in sauces, salsas and marinades, or even used to spice up a bloody mary. To rehydrate the whole chillies, just soak them in…

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3 things to know about

Chia seeds • Origins Chia seeds are the tiny black seeds from the salvia hispanica plant, a member of the mint family which comes from Central and South America. • Plant power Chia seeds have the highest content of omega-3 fatty acids of all plants, and even contain more, gram for gram, than salmon. This makes them a great source of omega-3 for vegetarians and vegans. • Usage Soaking then chilling chia seeds gives them a gel-like texture resembling tapioca (see our recipe on p76). Soaked chia seeds can also be used to thicken soups and stews and ground seeds can be used as a vegan egg substitute in baking. You can also dry-toast them to add crunch to salads.…

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trending now

New ways with ice cream sandwiches Forget cookies – every summer, we’re spotting inventive new ways to make delicious ice cream sandwiches, including using macarons, brownies, brioche buns and even baklava. See bbcgoodfood.com for Tom Kerridge’s recipe for these ice cream sandwiches made with choux pastry buns. Wine in a can Ever found yourself the only wine drinker at a picnic? With the rise of canned wines, you’ll never have to waste a bottle (never mind having to lug it around) again! Canned wines have grown in popularity in the past few years – see page 124 to find out more. Flavoured scotch eggs What’s a summer picnic without a scotch egg? We’re noticing a step away from tradition this year, seeing supermarket scotch eggs in flavours like salt & vinegar (Co-op), chorizo & chicken…

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eco-friendly coffee pods

Coffee machines that use capsules or pods have risen in popularity in the last few years. In fact, research by The Grocer showed that nearly a third of Brits own one. While they are a neat, speedy way to make coffee at home, these machines have been criticised for their impact on the environment. Many of the most common capsules on the market are difficult, if not impossible, to recycle so often end up in landfill. However, we’ve noticed a change in the last couple of years, with more compostable, biodegradable capsules on the market, including Halo (halo.coffee), Eden Project (edenproject.com), and Lost Sheep Coffee (lostsheepcoffee. com) that go one step further with airtight capsules. Stuart Wilson, founder of Lost Sheep Coffee explains, ‘Until recently, compostable capsules would lose their…

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