EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Cars & Motorcycles
BBC Top Gear Magazine

BBC Top Gear Magazine February 2020

Top Gear is the worlds most exciting Car magazine bringing you up to date news, the latest drives and stunning features.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
BBC Worldwide Limited
Frequency:
Monthly
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13 Issues

in this issue

1 min.
welcome

Editor-in-chief @TopGearEditor editor@bbctopgearmagazine.com All of us who love cars spend more time than is healthy dreaming about the ‘what if’? A process that started in our childhoods has stayed with us, fuelled the passion, and forms a fundamental part of our love of the subject matter. It’s no surprise, then, that we spend a disproportionate amount of time in TGHQ discussing what would make up our dream three-car garage. The money-no-object version reveals a lot about the psyche of those involved. Do they go all ‘influencer’ and opt for three current hypercars? Or do they tackle it with a broader brush and opt for something historic, with a story to tell, and a suitably stratospheric price tag (original Jaguar C-type), then go for a one-car-suits-all option with a broad range of capabilities for their…

1 min.
director’s cut

Mark Riccioni “Who’d have thought a man who chain smokes Marlboro and kills tyres faster than Greta Thunberg updates her Twitter bio, could coin a nickname like Smokey” Andy Franklin “Standing around in a freezing hangar for two days is not glamourous. Luckily, I had the talent of John Wycherley to deliver on my impossible demands” Rowan Horncastle “You can point a camera at a turd during a Californian sunset and make it pretty. The results when you have a Bronco to play with are nothing short of epic”…

3 min.
driving the dbx

Normally in an Aston Martin, off-road equals end of the road. But not now. This is the DBX, and it’s just getting started. There are six driving modes and five ride heights to choose from, 95mm of total suspension rise and fall. But it’s early in Oman and I haven’t woken up, so I don’t feel the DBX lift 15mm when I engage Terrain mode. Not sure I needed it anyway. The DBX is assured as it gains altitude – no sudden lurch or crash, firmer than a Range Rover, but traction is good, it clambers calmly. This is not the finished article. You knew that by the litter of sponsor decals, more a distraction than a disguise. But with a low roof, 22s and short, plunging bonnet, it’s surprising how…

1 min.
coffee break

Meet Vincent Van Gogh This exhibition from Amsterdam promises an immersive multisensory experience. Well worth the trip to LDN and it’s not ear-cuttingly expensive either Don’t F**k With Cats This Netflix true-crime documentary is like nothing you’ve seen before. Be warned: if you like cats, it’s very disturbing. And, no, it’s NOT like 8 out of 10 Cats Does Countdown 1917 Sir Sam Mendes’ latest film and his first written screenplay, is as epic as the reviews suggest. Not a prequel to 2001: A Space Odyssey King Gary This suburban comedy on BBC One & iPlayer is a right royal gem. Meet the new King, sooo different from the old King #AccidentallyWesAnderson Not just a hashtag, but a must-follow Insta account. WARNING! If you love your Wes, you’ll begin to spend every second of the day seeking out potential…

2 min.
mika hakkinen sitting on a mclaren, on a golf course

Great art requires no context. Thus, when Mika Hakkinen posted the below photo to his Instagram account late last year, it was captioned, simply: ‘When I go golfing it is like this.” This is irrefutably true. Nonetheless, it’s an image that raises a number of questions. Most pertinently: is there a Formula One car parked in the middle of a golf course? It’s a combination that, traditionally, screams ‘promotional event’. But there are no promotional event accoutrements to be seen here: no flags, no hoardings, just a double F1 world champ, sitting on a McLaren. The chaps in the background appear gloriously unaware there’s anything unusual going on behind them. Maybe there isn’t. Maybe this is how Mika spends every weekend. Can we therefore assume that Mika is… planning on using his…

2 min.
porsche mea culpa

You certainly can’t accuse Porsche of not listening. Nor being afraid of a public U-turn. A decade after switching its horrid PDK button shifters for normal paddles, it’s put six-cylinder power back in the Boxster and Cayman. If you’ve read anything on the internet in recent years, you’ll have seen at least some diatribe angled at the 718 Boxster and 718 Cayman. Specifically, at their switch to rumbly four-cylinder turbo engines, which have proved barely more economical than the glorious naturally aspirated flat-sixes they turfed out of Porsche’s mid-engined sports cars. So we arrive at this, the new 718 GTS, which gains the 4.0-litre flat-six engine that’s appeared in the recent Cayman GT4 and 718 Spyder. They were motorsport specials from the same department as the GT3 and GT2 RS, so were…