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BritainBritain

Britain July/August 2017

Packed with 196-pages of the best attractions, days out, places to stay and food and drink destinations, the 2015 BRITAIN Guide is your definitive companion to getting the best out of your holiday. From forgotten medieval villages, to country houses within easy access of London and shopping areas for picking up quintessential gifts, you won’t want to leave home without it.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Chelsea Magazine
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6 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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editor's letter

Unless you’ve been hiding under a rock for the past few months, you’ll know that this marks 200 since the death of one of our most cherished writers, Jane Austen. In The Bulletin (p9) you can read about a new exhibition exploring the novelist’s relationship with the sea, while in The Road to Bath (p24) , we arrive at her adopted home city via an unusual route: the Cotswold Way. This year also marks the 20th anniversary of the passing of another famous figure, Princess Diana. In From Debutante to Princess (p34) we chart the evolution of the young lady once dubbed ‘Shy Di’ into a national treasure and royal icon. If it’s travel that excites you then we’ve found the perfect castle stay in Hever’s Hideaways (p40), and, if like us…

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your letters

INDEPENDENT WOMAN I am going to be spending three glorious weeks in Britain in July and most of my trip has been planned and based upon the wonderful places and articles I researched, read, and explored through your wonderful magazine. Your recommendations, articles, points of interest and many other suggestions are deeply appreciated. This will be my second trip to Britain but the first I have planned on my own – with your expert help. I look forward to being a subscriber (and visitor) for many, many years to come. Deborah Sandberg Harsen, via Facebook WHEN IN OXFORD I’ve been an Anglophile for years, so my visits to Great Britain, in person and via this great magazine, are a big part of my life. I was interested to read about the piece of fabric that may…

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tuned in to turner

Once again the latest issue of Britain (Volume 85, Issue 2) struck many chords with me as I read it from cover to cover. I grew up reading the Chronicles of Narnia and often had nightmares of lions and soldiers walking out of my wardrobe. The piece on Chatsworth brought back memories of a visit to this lovely home a number of years ago, as did the piece on the Norfolk Broads, of when I spent a delightful week in Norwich. The islands article reminded me of a visit to Skye and enticed me with an upcoming visit to Northumberland where I hope to see as much of the isolated island of Lindisfarne as is currently open. The small write-up on JMW Turner, however, had the largest impact on me, as he and his…

access_time5 min.
the bulletin

EXHIBITION Nelson & Norfolk A major new exhibition at Norwich Castle Museum and Art Gallery explores the nation’s fascination with Admiral Lord Nelson, the hero of the Battle of Trafalgar, who saved Britain from the threat of Napoleonic invasion but died in the process. Nelson & Norfolk (29 July to 1 October) tells Nelson’s story through unique objects, from the undress coat and hat he wore at the Battle of the Nile, to the French tricolour ensign captured in 1800. The exhibition, held in the naval hero’s home county, also includes extensive funeral memorabilia and examines the way in which his achievements continue to be celebrated over 200 years after his death. The exhibition is complemented by loans from around the country, including a large 1801 portrait of Nelson [pictured] by artist Sir William…

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reading corner

Camping on the Wye: Four Victorian Gents row the Wye in a randan skiff in 1892 by SK Baker (£10, Bloomsbury) Journal account of university friends travelling up the River Wye Walking the Hebridean Way by Richard Barrett (£14.95, Cicerone Press) Explore the 155-mile-long walking route through Scotland’s stunning Outer Hebrides Collecting The World: The Life and Curiosity of Hans Sloane by James Delbourgo (£25, Allen Lane) Discover the contribution of London-based physician and collector Hans Sloane The Kitchen Garden by Caroline Ikin (£8.99, Amberley Publishing) Part of the new British Heritage series, dig in to the history and world of Britain’s kitchen gardens and their gardeners The Jane Austen Treasury: A delightful collection of insights into her life, her times, her novels by Janet Todd (£9.99, Carlton Books) A lovely overview of adored…

access_time8 min.
suffolk wool towns

By the time medieval England was entering the Early Modern Period (around 1485), wool was the veritable engine of the economy, thanks largely to the huge demand that existed for it from the fashionable cloth-making regions of Belgium, France and Italy. And nowhere benefitted more from this trade than Suffolk, where the confluence of an abundance of sheep and wool merchants made a noticeable impact on the towns and villages where the wool was produced. Arguably the centrepiece of the trade was Lavenham where a plethora of well preserved timber-framed buildings line the streets, in a place that is thought to possess some of the finest examples of medieval architecture in Britain today. The intricate buildings constructed out of great British oaks were limewashed in different hues to produce the vibrant…

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