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BritainBritain

Britain March/April 2017

Packed with 196-pages of the best attractions, days out, places to stay and food and drink destinations, the 2015 BRITAIN Guide is your definitive companion to getting the best out of your holiday. From forgotten medieval villages, to country houses within easy access of London and shopping areas for picking up quintessential gifts, you won’t want to leave home without it.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Chelsea Magazine
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$32.22
6 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
editor's letter

This issue I’ve had the pleasure of writing about one of my literary heroes, CS Lewis, in Step into Narnia ( 14) as I discovered the real-life places in Northern Ireland that inspired his fantastical world, from ancient castles to mighty mountains that look big enough to hide a giant or two. One place I was already familiar with is Chatsworth House in Derbyshire, but in Dress Like a Duchess (p33) it was nice seeing the stately opulence via the glamorous ladies who have walked its halls and their beautiful wardrobes – I also enjoyed reading about some of their scandalous secrets. If you have a Britain bucket list then no doubt Edinburgh Castle (p70) features highly, but a visit to Oxford University, which turns 850 this year, should also be considered.…

access_time2 min.
your letters

FOND FAMILY MEMORIES I received the January 2017 (Volume 84, Issue 6) issue two days ago and have read it from cover to cover. I was so excited to see York noted on the front; it’s my favourite city in England. I was born in London in 1937 but my mom’s family came from York. I have spent many happy hours visiting family in this most beautiful city. This guide brought back many memories. Cousins, at one time, ran Ye Olde Starre Inne and I’ve had a drink and eaten a good meal there. I’ve climbed Clifford’s Tower, walked the city walls many times, visited the National Railway Museum and toured the wonderful York Minster and JORVIK Viking Centre; wonderful cousins even took me to Castle Howard. I have a beautiful framed needlepoint…

access_time1 min.
emma’s legacy

My sister and I were in the Timber Corps (a branch of the Land Army) during the Second World War. We were stationed at the Earl of Leicester’s estate in Holkham, Norfolk. We often cycled to Burnham Thorpe, the boyhood home of Lord Nelson. I was most interested in your biography of Emma Hamilton (Volume 84, Issue 6), however there is no mention of what became of her daughter, Horatia. I wondered if you could tell me what happened to her? Doris W Jones, Ohio, US BRITAIN replies: You’ll be pleased to hear Horatia’s life was much less troubled than her mother’s. She spent her adolescence with Nelson’s sister and her subsequent marriage to a clergyman was deemed a happy one and produced 10 children.…

access_time5 min.
the bulletin

ANNIVERSARY Remembering Jane This year is the bicentenary of the death of Jane Austen, one of Britain’s most beloved novelists, and in the county of Hampshire, where she was born and spent most of her life, a huge programme of events will mark the anniversary. From a landmark exhibition, talks and walks to picnics and performances, Jane Austen 200: A Life in Hampshire is set to explore the writer’s relationship with the houses, people and landscapes that inspired her. The Mysterious Miss Austen, presented in partnership with Jane Austen’s House Museum, (13 May-24 July), will launch at the Gallery in Winchester Discovery Centre, before moving to the Gallery at Gosport Discovery Centre and then the Sainsbury Gallery at Basingstoke’s Willis Museum. The exhibition features five portraits of Jane together for the first time –…

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reading corner

Take Courage: Anne Brontë and the Art of Life by Samantha Ellis (Penguin, £16.99) A poignant and surprising journey into the life and work of the sidelined Brontë sister’s history. Canals of Britain: A Comprehensive Guide by Stuart Fisher (Bloomsbury, £30) Everything you will ever need to know about the canal network of the British Isles – from the smallest to largest. The Trench Cook Book 1917 by Hannah Holman (Amberley, £9.99) A fascinating look at how troops cooked in the field during the First World War, featuring facsimile documents. Lost England 1870-1930 by Philip Davies (Historic England, £45) This study records one of the great transitions in England's history as the country shifted to urban living. The Good Pub Guide 2017 (Ebury Press, £15.99) The 35th edition of this guide is organised by…

access_time6 min.
step into narnia

What child didn’t wish that they too could step into a wardrobe and out into another realm? His preternatural land of Narnia, first introduced to the world with the publication in 1950 of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, fired the imaginations of generations of children. What child didn’t read CS Lewis’s series of seven fantasy novels, The Chronicles of Narnia, and wish they too could step into a wardrobe and out into another realm – one where talking animals led them on adventures to rid the world of evil, and they were rewarded by being crowned kings and queens? In Narnia, anything could happen and it often did. Born in Belfast in 1898, Clive Staples Lewis (nicknamed Jack) was an accomplished scholar and writer who rose to become Fellow and…

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