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BritainBritain

Britain November/December 2017

Packed with 196-pages of the best attractions, days out, places to stay and food and drink destinations, the 2015 BRITAIN Guide is your definitive companion to getting the best out of your holiday. From forgotten medieval villages, to country houses within easy access of London and shopping areas for picking up quintessential gifts, you won’t want to leave home without it.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Chelsea Magazine
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6 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
editor's letter

This issue I travelled to the Peak District where I was staggered by the glorious views of Britain’s first national park and the sheer number of pretty stone villages that pepper its lush valleys and peat moors. I also got to see firsthand one of Britain’s most idiosyncratic traditions – that of well dressing. Read all about this special place, plus the people who found inspiration here, in Peak Places (p64). Talking of inspirational places, a small corner of Sussex, plus chats with his young son were all the stimuli AA Milne needed to create his beloved Winnie-the-Pooh stories. Ahead of a major new exhibition, we map out the places that feature in that fictional world in Going on a Bear Hunt (p14) . Also this issue, our history expert explores Charles…

access_time2 min.
your letters

EDEN UNCOVERED Earlier this summer I made my 11th trip to England. I love everything about your beautiful country and try to explore a new area each time I travel there. This past visit I spent some time in Yorkshire, basing myself in York and doing several day trips to the surrounding towns and villages. My travels took me to Eden Camp Modern History Theme Museum. It was amazing and I am wondering if you have ever featured it in your magazine? It is a must-see for anyone with an interest in Second World War history. Eden Camp was initially built as a prisoner of war camp and it was fascinating to learn not only about how the prisoners spent their time (many helped out on local farms), but also to see…

access_time1 min.
letter of the month queen of scones

I read with interest the article ‘Her Majesty’s Recipe for Drop Scones’ in September’s BRITAIN (Volume 85 Issue 4) and the sidebar that stated that HM The Queen is said to have sent this recipe to President Eisenhower 50 years ago. The book Dear Mr President: Letters to the Oval Office from the Files of the National Archives by Dwight Young (published by National Geographic), features Her Majesty’s note and shows that the original recipe differs slightly from this interpretation. Her Majesty’s 1960 recipe was as follows: 4 teacups flour 4 tablespoons caster sugar (the Queen said she had used golden syrup or treacle instead, which can be very good, too) 2 teacups milk 2 whole eggs 2 teaspoons bicarbonate soda 3 teaspoons cream of tartar 2 tablespoons melted butter The quantity is for 16 people, but Her…

access_time5 min.
the bulletin

ROYAL FAMILY The Queen and I Theirs is the longest royal marriage in history. On 20 November, Her Majesty The Queen and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, will celebrate their platinum anniversary – a mere 70 years of marriage. The couple met when Elizabeth, then just 13, visited Philip’s naval college in Dartmouth. It was love at first sight. Eight years later, their wedding at Westminster Abbey brightened up the gloom of post-war Britain. During a long and happy union, the couple have combined thousands of public engagements with raising four children: Charles, Anne, Andrew and Edward. As the Queen said on their golden anniversary in 1997, her husband is her “strength and stay”. As for the longest marriage, it is going to be a hard record to beat. HISTORY Winter at Windsor At 11.15am…

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reading corner

Britain’s Best Small Hills by Phoebe Smith (£14.99, Bradt Travel Guides) Plan a scramble or a day out in the countryside in pursuit of heady views and magnificent sights. Be sure to pack your walking boots Who Built Scotland: A History of the Nation in Twenty-five Buildings by Kathleen Jamie et al (£20, Historic Environment Scotland) Explore the castles, abbeys and glens that shaped Scotland The Country House Library (£45, Yale University Press) Rummage through the crammed bookshelves of the great and the good Entitled: A Critical History of the British Aristocracy by Chris Bryant (£25, Doubleday) Discover the warriors, eccentrics and criminals at the heart of the ruling class Queen Victoria's Matchmaking: The Royal Marriages that Shaped Europe by Deborah Cadbury (£25, Bloomsbury) An intimate and absorbing portrait of the Royal Family…

access_time6 min.
going on a bear hunt

Ashdown Forest retains all the charm that led Milne to pen his first book on the incorrigible bear with a penchant for honey The forest will always be there... and anybody who is friendly with bears can find it.” So AA Milne wrote of Ashdown Forest in The House at Pooh Corner and his words came true for this beautiful corner of East Sussex, which attracts everyone beguiled by the bear “of very little brain” and enormous heart who first appeared in print in the 1920s. This ancient hunting forest is about to come under the spotlight once more as Goodbye Christopher Robin, a major new film charting Pooh’s evolution, is released, followed closely by an exhibition at London’s Victoria and Albert Museum examining the partnership between Milne and his illustrator, EH…

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