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EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
 / Boating & Aviation
Classic BoatClassic Boat

Classic Boat

January 2020

Admire the world's most beautiful boats, brought to life through breath-taking photography. Classic Boat offers a unique blend of yacht reviews, seamanship and restoration features, history and design columns, practical advice and coverage of the leading international regattas and events. Whether your interest lies in working on restoration projects or sailing in classic regattas; whether you're a wooden boat owner or simply an admirer of traditional marine workmanship, Classic Boat will have something for you.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Chelsea Magazine
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12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

1 min.
it’s our fault… most of the time

There is one thing we are accused of as a magazine so often that it’s given me a sleepless night or two. The crime, such as it is, is in presenting the most stunning classic yachts in the world in a manner that inspires lust and dreams of ownership. I lose count of the times someone at the end of a major project has told me: “It’s all your fault you know – I bought the boat after finding her in your magazine.” Usually it’s jocular, and the experience turned out well, but I have also, sadly, heard of things going very badly indeed. The moral? If you’re going to singlehandedly restore a 66ft yacht on the salary of a navy seal, you’d better be… well, a navy seal (see…

9 min.
100 ears of the s-class

Every summer since 1920, spirited small yachts have given their sailors that special feeling, that contented smile that comes from crossing the bay, tiller in hand, at the helm of a wooden boat that cuts through the chop – wind in your hair, spray in your face – like no other boat you have ever sailed. With an immense main sail, tall spruce mast and steady, full-lead ballast keel, the Herreshoff S-boats drive confidently through gusty winds and sail circles around other boats in light zephyrs. With 2019 marking the centennial anniversary of one of Nathanael Herreshoff’s most enduring and innovative yacht designs, his S-Class is still going strong. Large fleets of these one-design racers on Long Island Sound, Buzzards Bay and Narragansett Bay continue to inspire sailors with a thrilling…

1 min.
logbook out and about cannes and saint-tropez

Although a day was lost to high winds at both Régates Royales in Cannes and at Les Voiles de Saint-Tropez, the events otherwise provided great sailing in a variety of winds and glorious sunshine. However, near gale force gusts on the last day in Cannes saw 36 retirements and a broken mizzen mast on S&S yawl Comet. While two boats won their classes at both regattas – the Italian 12-M Il Moro de Venezia and the 1949 Germán Frers sloop Cippino II – honours were otherwise shared. In the small ga. ers, Fife cutters Kismet (1898) and Viola (1908) took first and second at both events; Viola winning in Cannes and Kismet in St-Tropez. At each regatta just one boat had a perfect score line: Vanessa in Cannes and the mighty…

12 min.
tell tales

BARCOLANA CLASSIC Classics race on eve of the world’s biggest sailing race Trieste’s Barcolana race is offcially the biggest sailing race in the world – 2,689 boats in the 50th anniversary race in 2018 and a highly respectable 2,015 in 2019, all on the same two-mile long start line, writes Nigel Sharp. The day before this big race, however, there is the Barcolana Classic race, this year attracting 107 boats, 24 of them from host Yacht Club Adriaco, which is said to be the second oldest yacht club in the Mediterranean. I was sailing on the 1963 Cheoy Lee-built Jan Gilda, one of three Vertues taking part. Jan Gilda’s home port is Jezera in Croatia, about 180 miles down the coast, and she is owned and helmed by Croatian Trnovski (Tiho) Tihomir.…

9 min.
how we saved each other

Let no one, least of all this magazine, if only by implication, ever tell you that restoring an old wooden boat is easy. In 2010, Danish man Bendix Sandfoss Laxvig was visiting Copenhagen and spotted a 66ft (20.1m) ketch lying in Frederiksholm Canal. She’d been there for 26 years, letting the elements wreak their havoc on her fabric. Bendix, a lifelong member of the Frogman Corps (the Danish equivalent of the SBS or Navy Seals), had been sailing since the age of eight, starting with a friend in Optimists out of Elsinor and moving into the yacht-racing scene in Denmark, helming everything from Folkboats to X-boats, with some of the country’s most noted sailors. Through all these years, Bendix somehow managed to avoid owning a boat of his own. The…

2 min.
saleroom

Tea clipper photo finish The Cutty Sark may be the most famous tea clipper of them all, but she never came close to eclipsing the speed achieved by rivals Ariel and Taeping in the fastest and closest tea race in history. The Taeping, laid down in 1863, and the 1865 Ariel were among the first generation of composite ships with wooden planking on iron frames. Yet even before the similarly constructed Cutty Sark joined the rivalry in 1869, the pair had made history in the epic 1866 tea race from Fuzhou in China. Passing and re-passing continuously on the long voyage, the pair raced neck and neck, logging 14 knots up the Channel, with Ariel signalling her arrival o. Deal 10 minutes ahead of Taeping. However, after waiting for the tide it was…