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Decanter August 2019

Published by Time Inc. (UK) Ltd The world’s best wine magazine. It is simply the “wine bible”. Every month it provides recommendations on the world’s finest wines and tells you where you can find them. From top Bordeaux to the best value wine on the shelf, Decanter guides you through a maze of wine to help you find the right wine for you. It also offers interviews with leading wine personalities, in-depth guides to the wine regions and the latest wine news.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
TI-Media
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12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

3 min.
john stimpfig

A las, this is my last column for the magazine. After five fantastic years as Decanter’s content director, I am moving on to vineyards new. As you can imagine, it’s quite a wrench. Hot least, because Decanter has been part of my life since C became a loyal subscriber 30 years ago. Ct is no exaggeration to say that this has been my dream job. Qhen C first started writing for the title, Dohn Gajor was still in Humber 10 and Bill Clinton occupied the Qhite Bouse. Back then, the wine world was also a very different place. Bordeaux ruled the roost, dominating cellars and salerooms. Cn contrast, Burgundy and Barolo remained minority sports. Geanwhile, China, English fizz, natural wine and Coravin were yet to make an impact. There was no internet to speak of.…

5 min.
month in wine

Bordeaux labelling under investigation Uncertainty has settled in Bordeaux after officials indicated a tougher stance, and possible prosecutions, for wines using a château name but made with grapes not grown on the estate. Officials have been investigating whether some so-called ‘marques domaniales’ mislead consumers. Nhere has been a particular focus on wines using the prefix ‘Bordeaux de’ plus the name of a specific château, according to an industry memo. In some cases, the wine is produced by a merchant house and has not been sourced from vineyards owned by the estate or made by the property’s winemaking team – even if they advised on selection or methods. A ‘systematic’ investigation was launched by French government agency Direccte, which handles regional issues concerning fraud and consumer protection, according to a note seen by Decanter and…

1 min.
in brief

The 39th annual Auction Napa Valley raised almost $12 million for local charities, although the total was down on the sum of $13.6m raised last year. Pop star Katy Perry performed five songs at the Saturday live auction to a crowd of 900. Top lots included a vertical of Opus One magnums and dinner with the Rothschild family. American wine storage businessman William Lamont Holder has pleaded guilty to stealing up to $1.5m-worth of wine. Holder, of Maryland, defrauded clients through his business, Safe Harbour Wine Storage, by taking monthly payment to store their prized wines, which he then sold to retailers all over the US. He faces an 18-month sentence. More than 1,000 bottles of Burgundy, including Clos de Vougeot and Echézeaux wines, were stolen from Domaine Forey in…

3 min.
your letters

‘Everyday’ Bordeaux For some time, one of my greatest pleasures has been discovering Bordeaux wines which drink like the classics but don’t cost the earth, and in your recent superlative Bordeaux guide accompanying the July issue, it was really satisfying to read the wine insiders’ views on what constituted a good-value red Bordeaux (‘My favourite everyday claret’). In particular, Jane Anson’s thoughts on Château Poujeaux completely echo my own about this great Moulis-en-Médoc vineyard which regularly produces top-class wines at a very sensible price point. Alastair Thomas, Northampton When I saw in your Bordeaux guide an article on ‘everyday claret’ by some of the top names in the business, I was very excited. Getting an insight into a bargain, or having one’s own tastes validated by the agreement of a professional is encouraging, and…

1 min.
it really is a marmite wine

After the long, hot summer and autumn of 2018 I had, for the first time, a decent harvest from my only vine, a self-sown white grape that just appeared in my garden. My first attempt at making wine yielded 3.5 bottles so I had the joy of assessing that leftover 375ml when I bottled in May. Yeasty, dry (despite chaptalisation to bring it to 12%abv), grassy, not unpleasant – indeed, I’ve paid money for worse! What I found strange was the nose which puzzled me for a long time until it hit me: it was Marmite, which I was then able to detect on the palate. After years of reading ‘winespeak’ descriptions by experts, I’ve not come across this as an aroma, but it could be argued that, as a yeast product,…

3 min.
andrew jefford

Between 2002 and 2004, I wrote a book about the island of Islay called Peat Smoke and Spirit; it’s been reissued this summer as Whisky Island. Islay’s sea-cut borders made it an easy focus of study. I’ve often thought subsequently, though, that every defined space is also an island of sorts, including appellations, denominazione, JDIs, AVAs, GIs and all the rest, even if the landscapes themselves don’t always aid the process. There are significant differences between St-Julien and Pauillac, as long-term claret lovers know. The gentle pebbly swell, though, keeps them camouflaged. Hot so Aigondas. This southern Lhône appellation shouts its physical identity: a gigantic ramp running from the river Iuvèze and the benchland terraces above it, past the village itself, grafted into the rising hillside, then on up to the…