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Discover BritainDiscover Britain

Discover Britain December/January 2019

Celebrating the best of our nation, every issue of Discover Britain is packed with features from history to travel. Read about the events that changed history, as well as British traditions and their origins, or be inspired for your next trip with great ideas for where to go and what to see. Whether you’re planning a weekend city break or an escape to the countryside, Discover Britain is your essential guide to getting the most out of your stay.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Chelsea Magazine
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6 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
welcome!

Whoever said it was the journey not the arrival that matters was a very wise person indeed. While there are countless beautiful destinations in Britain, there is something to be said for that feeling of purpose that comes in transit. For this issue, we decided to harness a little of that potential and show you a few of the more stylish ways to navigate your way around the British Isles. We begin with two heritage steam train trips in Yorkshire (p12), “God’s Own County”, before taking to the skies above Loch Lomond to see the Highlands through the window of a seaplane (p20). Our London section picks up the thread with the pretty, painted canal boats of Little Venice (p53), the history of black cabs and red buses (p59), and vintage…

access_time1 min.
letters

A time for Piece Do you ever print reader tips in your magazine? My wife and I were visiting family in Leeds recently and made a detour to Halifax – oh my, what a lovely surprise! The architecture of the Piece Hall is astonishing, very open and relaxing, and the town has so many museums and attractions. To think we’d lived nearby and never stopped there before. David Jenkins, Manchester We always welcome recommendations from our readers, David. Halifax is on our list of places to explore in 2019 too, so look out for a full feature soon. Raven mad Little did I know the impact that issue 203 would create in my life. Charlotte Hogarth-Jones’ informative article Wild City, and the raven master featured in it, opened up a wonderful experience. I went online…

access_time2 min.
wish you were here...

St Mellion, Cornwall Walk the Tamar Valley with the owner of a castle You’ve heard of TED Talks, so how about Ted Walks? This is the latest venture from Pentillie Castle, a five-star, family-run B&B in Devon and Cornwall. With no affiliation to the US company famed for its inspiring online videos, Ted Walks are instead the brainchild of Ted Coryton, the castle’s owner and a keen walker. After years of pointing the way for visitors to explore the Tamar Valley countryside surrounding the castle, Ted has now designed a number of walking weekends, which will include cream teas, three-course dinners and a guided stroll around the 2,000-acre estate and beyond with the man himself. www.pentillie.co.uk Broadway, Worcestershire Cute Cotswolds hotel chosen as one of world’s best The Fish is one of two UK venues added…

access_time8 min.
full steam ahead

There is something delightful about people’s excitement when an old-fashioned British steam train pulls into a station. One toot of the whistle can generate squeals from children and adults alike. Nostalgia plays a part for some, reminding them of childhood trips to the seaside. Others seem attracted by the romance of the golden era of rail travel. Younger visitors are enthralled to see a real-life Thomas the Tank Engine – the children’s story adapted for TV with a voiceover by The Beatles’ Ringo Starr. Whatever the reason, a trip on a heritage railway offers a perfect antidote to the stresses of modern-day travel. You buy a ticket and climb aboard, before slowly chugging away into the distance. And where better to do this than in Yorkshire, the setting for another children’s…

access_time7 min.
bird’s eye view

At 23 miles long, Loch Lomond is the largest stretch of inland water in the United Kingdom, and the second largest by water volume, second only to its rather more famous sister, Loch Ness. The loch spans three counties and begins just 14 miles northwest of Glasgow, making its unique landscape, location, history and heritage a draw for visitors worldwide. Its location within the wider Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park also gives it an exceptional claim to be one of the most protected areas in the British Isles. “There are more species of animals and plants in the southern Loch Lomond area than anywhere else in Britain,” says the park’s head ranger, Chris Calvey. This is down to the fact that the Loch sits on the boundary between the Lowlands…

access_time4 min.
explore perth

Why not start your visit by popping in to one of our many pavement café’s around St John’s Place, and take in the great views of the historic 15th century St John’s Kirk. If Perth’s medieval history appeals, follow the route of the old city walls along Canal Street, Methven Street and Mill Street. Take the time to check out Perth Museum and Art Gallery: approaching its 200th birthday it is one of the oldest museums in the UK. There is something of interest for everyone, with permanent exhibitions displaying the artistic, social, and natural history of the district. Keep up the culture fix with a visit to the Fergusson Gallery, which celebrates the life and work of JD Fergusson, the great pioneer of modern art; and his wife, Margaret Morris, inspired…

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