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Harper's Bazaar UK

Harper's Bazaar UK

August 2021

One of the world's most influential fashion titles, Harper's Bazaar has always been famous for its ability to blend inspiring fashion with intelligent features. Harper's Bazaar is for the sophisticated, discerning woman, bringing her a perfect mix of stunning fashion stories, informed arts coverage, informative beauty pages and strong, intelligent features every month.

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Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Hearst Magazines UK
Frequency:
Monthly
$6.58
$57.64
12 Issues

in this issue

1 min
the body

harper’s Bazaar For all of us, our relationship with our body is never a simple one – at times it can bring us joy; at other times, the pressures of modern society can lead us to feel emotions that are less positive. In this issue, we look at both sides of the coin, with a celebratory fashion shoot that glories in female physicality; and a powerful feature that examines five women’s perspectives on their own bodies, their limitations and their strengths. Elsewhere, we talk to the legendary actress Isabella Rossellini; take a stylish trip to the English seaside; and enjoy new fiction, with the winning entries in our annual short-story competition. Sustenance, then, for both body and mind… AUGUST 2021 ISSUE…

2 min
9 music dance for joy

I have been dancing in the street all my life. As a child, my dad worked for the city council of Detroit and he got permission to close off our block with yellow tape, so during the summer we could have street festivals. Everybody had their record-players on their porches; sometimes we’d all tune our radios to the same station, and we would dance every Saturday until midnight. In 1962, when I was 21, I was working nine to five at the dry-cleaners and would perform in the evenings at the 20 Grand club for five dollars a night. A man called William Stevenson approached me and gave me a card inviting me to audition at the studio of Berry Gordy, the founder of Motown Records. This was where I cut…

1 min
5 photography discover the art of botanical portraiture

For the photographer Kate Friend’s new portrait series, she asked her subjects – figures from the worlds of fashion, art and gardening, including Margaret Howell, Juergen Teller and Molly Goddard – to choose a favourite flower, weed or tree that best represents themselves on camera. The biographical botanical was then styled and shot by Friend, in the context of each collaborator’s home or studio. As the peculiarly personal images go on display at the Garden Museum, three participants share the sentiment behind their plant of choice. ‘Kate Friend: Botanical Portraits’ is at the Garden Museum (www.gardenmuseum.org.uk) until 1 August. THE GARDENER ALYS FOWLER ON HER CORN POPPY ‘I don’t exactly grow this poppy, it’s more of a case that it chose my garden to come and play in. In spring my garden is…

2 min
2 theatre see a show

The playwright Nina Raine puts confrontation at the heart of her work: Consent saw an adulterous couple hurl abuse (and tea kettles) at one another, while Tribes revolved around a raging father. Her latest production Bach & Sons, which delves into the Baroque composer’s life, channels that same passion. ‘He stabbed a bassoonist for being shit!’ Raine says. ‘He was unruly; in prison a couple of times.’ In the play, Raine traces the dynamics of a ‘screwedup family’ through her nimble dialogue, which boils down character motivations to their essence. ‘We love to hear people behaving badly and conflict is always exciting to watch,’ she says. ‘But anger for no reason is boring – to make a scene really juicy, agendas need to be layered into it.’ Although Bach & Sons…

1 min
4 ceramics say it with clay

Pollyanna Johnson ‘Plates are domestic and unassuming objects – the perfect stage for a quiet rebellion against the patriarchy,’ says Johnson, whose wryly subtitled ceramics are a revisionist feast of historic female art figures. www.pollyannajohnson.com Laetitia Rouget The Hackney-based French artist originally trained as a fashion designer before bringing her ‘wobbly and colourful’ aesthetic to her playful ceramics replete with female nudes and amusing annotations. www.laetitiarouget.com Alma Berrow Lipstick-smeared napkins, crumpled notes bearing chat-up lines and teacups with prawns for handles are just some of the witty, naughty inventions of Alma Berrow, who took up pottery mid-pandemic. ‘After I quit my job, I finally decided to jump in and turn all the weird and wonderful ideas I had in my brain into reality,’ she says. www.almaberrow.com PHOTOGRAPHS: THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, NEW YORK, THE RIKLIS COLLECTION OF McCRORY…

3 min
10 art be inspired by paula rego

‘I stumbled across Paula Rego’s work as a teenager. She busted the myth that grace and beauty were incompatible with danger and power. I am fortunate to live with her Nursery Rhymes images (1989) and the challenging work Amélia’s Dream (1998), which reveals two ballerinas ever-so-gently reaching inside the body of a dog. ‘Rego invites me to live in that inspiring and unsettling threshold between restless sleep and wakefulness. I cannot remember a time before I was captive to her visions: I have swallowed them whole somehow, so that they have influenced the way I move, the way I think, even the way I dream.’ CATE BLANCHETT, ACTRESS ‘I first saw and fell in love with Paula’s work in the 1990s: it was just brilliantly impressive painting, the sort that I never…